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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 19, 2023

Registration No. ____________

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM S-1

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

 

Alpine Auto Brokers Inc.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Nevada   6770   38-3970138
(State or other jurisdiction of   (Primary Standard Industrial   (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)   Classification Code Number)   Identification No.)

 

46 Reeves Road, Pakuranga 2010, New Zealand

Tel: +61 405223877

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of Registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

 

Copies to:

McMurdo Law Group, LLC

1185 Avenue of the Americas, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10036

(917) 318-2865

 

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the registration statement becomes effective.

 

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box. ☒

 

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

  Large Accelerated Filer Accelerated Filer
  Non-accelerated Filer Smaller reporting company
    Smaller reporting company

 

If an smaller reporting company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act ☐

 

WE HEREBY AMEND THIS REGISTRATION STATEMENT ON SUCH DATE OR DATES AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO DELAY ITS EFFECTIVE DATE UNTIL WE SHALL FILE A FURTHER AMENDMENT WHICH SPECIFICALLY STATES THAT THIS REGISTRATION STATEMENT SHALL THEREAFTER BECOME EFFECTIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 8(a) OF THE SECURITIES ACT, OR UNTIL THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE ON SUCH DATE AS THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION, ACTING PURSUANT TO SAID SECTION 8(a), MAY DETERMINE.

 

 

 

 

 

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state or other jurisdiction where offers or sales are not permitted.

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED SEPTEMBER 19, 2023

 

Alpine Auto Brokers Inc.

120,000,000 Shares of Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

 

This is a public offering of Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. (“ALTB,” or the “Company”). We are offering 120,000,000 Common Shares at $0.01 per share (the “Shares”), in a best effort, direct public offering, solely by our Chief Executive Officer, Yufeng Zhang, for the Company. There is no minimum proceeds threshold for the offering. The offering will terminate within 360 days from the date of this prospectus. The Company will retain all proceeds received from the shares sold on their account in this offering. The Company has not made any arrangements to place the proceeds in an escrow or trust account. Any proceeds received in this offering may be immediately used by the Company in its sole discretion. There are no minimum purchase requirements for each investor. All proceeds retained by the Company may not be sufficient to continue operations.

 

Our Shares are not currently traded on any national securities exchange, but are quoted on OTC Pink market under the symbol “ALTB.”

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. NHIL through its China based subsidiary, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. As such, the Company recognized the assets and liabilities of NHIL acquired in the reorganization, at their historical carrying amounts.

 

ALTB is not a Chinese operating company. ALTB is a Nevada holding company that operates business through Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd. (“YDTC”). The offering is being undertaken by ALTB, the Nevada corporation. Therefore, investors will be purchasing shares of common stock of ALTB, the Nevada holding company, not a Chinese operating company. Any use of the terms “we” or “us” herein in regard to the common stock offered hereby refers to ALTB, the Nevada holding company. Any use of the terms “we” or “us” herein in regard to the operations refers to YDTC, the Chinese operating company.

 

The Company exercises control over the operations of YDTC, as its wholly-owned subsidiary. On February 17, 2023, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, issued the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies, or the Trial Measures, which became effective on March 31, 2023. Pursuant to the Trial Measures, domestic companies that seek to offer or list securities overseas, both directly and indirectly, should fulfill the filing procedure and report relevant information to the CSRC. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning or sanctions regarding our planned overseas listing from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. As the Trial Measures were newly published and there is uncertainty with respect to the filing requirements and the implementation, if we are required to submit to the CSRC and complete the filing procedures of our overseas public offering and listing, we cannot be sure that we will be able to complete such filings in a timely manner. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with such filing requirements under the Trial Measures may result in forced corrections, warnings and fines against us and could materially hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities. In addition, changes in the legal, political and economic policies of the Chinese government, the relations between China and the United States, or Chinese or U.S. regulations may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Any such changes could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities to investors and could cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

 

 

YDTC is formed and operating the Peoples Republic of China (“Material PRC Company”) has been duly established and is validly existing as a limited liability company under the laws of the Peoples Republic of China (“PRC Laws”),and has received all authorizations required by the Peoples Republic of China (the “Governmental Authorizations”) for its establishment to the extent such Governmental Authorizations are required under applicable PRC Laws, and its business license is in full force and effect. The Material PRC Company has the capacity and authority to own assets, to conduct business, and to sue and be sued in its own name under PRC Laws. The articles of association, business license and other constitutional documents (if any) of the Material PRC Company complies with the requirements of applicable PRC Laws and are in full force and effect. The Material PRC Company has not taken any corporate action, nor has any legal proceedings commenced against it, for its liquidation, winding up, dissolution, or bankruptcy, for the appointment of a liquidation committee, team of receivers or similar officers in respect of its assets or for any adverse suspension, withdrawal, revocation or cancellation of its business license.

 

All of the equity interests of the Material PRC Company are owned by NHIL, a BVI company, and we believe the Material PRC Company has obtained all Governmental Authorizations for the ownership interest owned by NHIL. While we have not obtained an opinion from local counsel stating so, we believe this to be true based on the experience of management. The equity interests of the Material PRC Company are owned by NHIL free and clear of any pledge or other encumbrance under PRC Laws, and there are no outstanding rights, warrants or options to acquire, or instruments convertible into or exchangeable for, any equity interest in the Material PRC Company under PRC Laws.

 

All of our operations are conducted by our subsidiaries and through our wholly-foreign-owned entity (“WFOE”) based in China which involves unique risks to investors. Our WFOE structure is used to provide investors with exposure to foreign investment in China-based companies where Chinese law prohibits direct foreign investment in the operating companies. Investors may never hold equity interests in the Chinese operating company. The senior management and the shareholders of the domestic company play a very important role in the WFOE structure. Chinese regulatory authorities could disallow this structure, which would likely result in a material change in our operations and/or a material change in the value of the securities we are registering for sale, including that it could cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

The legal and operational risks associated with being based in or having the majority of the Company’s operations in China could result in a material change in the value of the securities we are registering for sale or could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. Please see the Risk Factor titled “We are faced with risks and uncertainties as a foreign enterprise under PRC laws” on page 18.

 

Trading securities may be prohibited under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“HFCAA”), as amended by the Consolidated Appropriations Act (“CAA”) of 2023. If the PCAOB determines that it cannot inspect or fully investigate the Company’s auditor for two consecutive years, and that as a result an exchange may determine to delist your securities. On December 29, 2022, the CAA was signed into law by President Biden. The CAA contained, among other things, an identical provision to the AHFCAA, which reduces the number of consecutive non-inspection years required for triggering the prohibitions under the HFCA Act from three years to two. Since our current registered public accounting firm, Shandong Haoxin Certified Accountants Co., Ltd., is located in the PRC and is currently subject to the PCAOB inspections every two years, you may be deprived of the benefits of regular inspections which could result in limitation or restriction to our access to the U.S. capital markets and trading of our securities on a national exchange or “over-the-counter” markets may be prohibited under the HFCAA. On December 24, 2021, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, issued Provisions of the State Council on the Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (Draft for Comments) (the “Administration Provisions”), and the Administrative Measures for the Filing of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Measures”), which were open for public comments by January 23, 2022. The Administration Provisions and Measures for overseas listings lay out specific requirements for filing documents and include unified regulation management, strengthening regulatory coordination, and cross-border regulatory cooperation. Domestic companies seeking to list abroad must carry out relevant security screening procedures if their businesses involve supervisions such as foreign investment security and cyber security reviews. Companies endangering national security are among those off-limits for overseas listings. As the Administration Provisions and Measures have not yet come into effect, we are currently unaffected by them. However, it is uncertain when the Administration Provision and the Measures will take effect or if they will take effect as currently drafted.

 

 

 

Regulatory Permission

 

As substantially all of our operations are conducted by our PRC Subsidiaries in China, we are subject to the associated legal and operational risks, including risks related to the legal, political and economic policies of the Chinese government, the relations between China and the United States, or Chinese or United States regulations, which risks could result in a material change in our operations and/or cause the value of our ordinary shares to significantly decline or become worthless, and affect our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Recently, the PRC government initiated a series of regulatory actions and made a number of public statements on the regulation of business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, and adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews.

 

On July 6, 2021, the relevant PRC government authorities made public the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities, which provided that the administration and supervision of overseas-listed China-based companies will be strengthened, and the special provisions of the State Council on overseas issuance and listing of shares by such companies will be revised, clarifying the responsibilities of domestic industry competent authorities and regulatory authorities. However, the Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities were only issued recently, leaving uncertainties regarding the interpretation and implementation of these opinions. It is possible that any new rules or regulations may impose additional requirements on us. As of the date of this prospectus, neither we nor our PRC Subsidiaries have been subject to any investigation, or received any notice, warning, or sanction from applicable government authorities related to this offering. In addition, neither we nor our PRC Subsidiaries have been involved in any review, investigation, enquiry, penalty, or other legal proceedings initiated by applicable governmental or regulatory authorities or third parties in relation to this offering.

 

The Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Companies by Foreign Investors, or the M&A Rules, adopted by six PRC regulatory agencies in 2006 and amended in 2009, requires an overseas special purpose vehicle formed for listing purposes through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies and controlled by PRC companies or individuals to obtain the approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. We will not be required to submit an application to the CSRC for the approval under the M&A Rules for an offering because (i) the CSRC currently has not issued any definitive rule or interpretation concerning whether offerings like ours are subject to this regulation; and (ii) we did not acquire any equity interests or assets of a “PRC domestic company” as such terms are defined under the M&A Rules. However, there remains some uncertainty as to how the M&A Rules will be interpreted or implemented in the context of an overseas offering and its opinions summarized above are subject to any new laws, rules and regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations in any form relating to the M&A Rules.

 

On December 28, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China (the “CAC”) jointly with the relevant authorities formally published Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) which took effect on February 15, 2022 and replace the former Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2020). Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) stipulates that operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services, and online platform operator (together with the operators of critical information infrastructure, the “Operators”) carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security, shall conduct a cybersecurity review, any online platform operator who controls more than one million users’ personal information must go through a cybersecurity review by the cybersecurity review office if it seeks to be listed in a foreign country. Given that: (i) we do not possess personal information on more than one million users in our business operations; and (ii) data processed in our business does not have a bearing on national security and thus may not be classified as core or important data by the authorities, this offering would not be required to apply for a cybersecurity review under the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021). As a result of the nature of the Company’s operations and size, the Company does not believe that the above is applicable to the Company. Additionally, The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business.

 

According to the Notice by the General Office of the State Council of Comprehensively Implementing the List-based Management of Administrative Licensing Items (No. 2 [2022] of the General Office of the State Council) and its attachment, the List of Administrative Licensing Items Set by Laws, Administrative Regulations, and Decisions of the State Council (2022 Edition), as of the date of this prospectus, our PRC subsidiary has received from PRC authorities all requisite licenses, permissions or approvals needed to engage in the businesses currently conducted in China. As of the date of this prospectus, neither we nor our PRC Subsidiary (i) are required to obtain permissions from any PRC authorities to operate or issue our ordinary shares to foreign investors, (ii) are subject to permission requirements from the CSRC, the CAC or any other entity that is required to approve our PRC Subsidiary’s operations, or (iii) have received or were denied such permissions by any PRC authorities.

 

 

 

As of the date of this prospectus, the only permission required for operations is the business license of the PRC subsidiary. The business license in PRC is a permit issued by Market Supervision and Administration that allows the company to conduct specific business within the government’s geographical jurisdiction. As of the date of this prospectus, our PRC subsidiary has received from PRC authorities all requisite licenses, permissions or approvals needed to engage in the businesses currently conducted in China, and no permission or approval has been denied.

 

We believe that we are not currently required to obtain approval from Chinese authorities, including the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, or Cybersecurity Administration Committee, or CAC, to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges/quotation servicers or issue securities to foreign investors, however, if we were required to obtain approval in the future and were denied permission from Chinese authorities to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges and/or quotation servicers, we will not be able to continue to be quoted or listed on U.S. exchanges, which would materially affect the interests of the investors. It is uncertain when and whether the Company will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges in the future, and even when such permission is obtained, whether it will be denied or rescinded. Although the Company is currently not required to obtain permission from any of the PRC central or local government to obtain such permission and has not received any denial to list or become quoted on the U.S. exchange, our operations could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future laws and regulations relating to its business or industry; if we inadvertently conclude that such approvals are not required when they are, or applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations change and we are required to obtain approval in the future.

 

On December 24, 2021, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, issued Provisions of the State Council on the Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (Draft for Comments) (the “Administration Provisions”), and the Administrative Measures for the Filing of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Measures”), which were open for public comments by January 23, 2022. The Administration Provisions and Measures for overseas listings lay out specific requirements for filing documents and include unified regulation management, strengthening regulatory coordination, and cross-border regulatory cooperation. Domestic companies seeking to list abroad must carry out relevant security screening procedures if their businesses involve supervisions such as foreign investment security and cyber security reviews. Companies endangering national security are among those off-limits for overseas listings. As the Administration Provisions and Measures have not yet come into effect, we are currently unaffected by them. However, it is uncertain when the Administration Provision and the Measures will take effect or if they will take effect as currently drafted.

 

On February 17, 2023, with the approval of the State Council, the CSRC released the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Trial Measures”) and five supporting guidelines, which will come into effect on March 31, 2023. According to the Trial Measures, among other requirements, (1) domestic companies that seek to offer or list securities overseas, both directly and indirectly, should fulfill the filing procedures with the CSRC; if a domestic company fails to complete the filing procedures, such domestic company may be subject to administrative penalties; and (2) where a domestic company seeks to indirectly offer and list securities in an overseas market, the issuer shall designate a major domestic operating entity responsible for all filing procedures with the CSRC, and such filings shall be submitted to the CSRC within three business days after the submission of the overseas offering and listing application. On the same day, the CSRC also held a press conference for the release of the Trial Measures and issued the Notice on Administration for the Filing of Overseas Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies, which clarifies that (1) on or prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, domestic companies that have already submitted valid applications for overseas offering and listing but have not obtained approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges may reasonably arrange the timing for submitting their filing applications with the CSRC, and must complete the filing before the completion of their overseas offering and listing; (2) a six-month transition period will be granted to domestic companies which, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, have already obtained the approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges, but have not completed the indirect overseas listing; if domestic companies fail to complete the overseas listing within such six-month transition period, they shall file with the CSRC according to the requirements; and (3) the CSRC will solicit opinions from relevant regulatory authorities and complete the filing of the overseas listing of companies with contractual arrangements which duly meet the compliance requirements, and support the development and growth of these companies.

 

 

 

With respect to the domestic company, non-compliance with the Trial Measures or an overseas listing completed in breach of it may result in a warning or a fine ranging from RMB 1 million to RMB10 million. Furthermore, the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company may be warned, or fined between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million and the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company may be warned, or fined between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million. If, during the filing process, the domestic company conceals important factors or the content is materially false, and securities are not issued, they are subject to a fine of RMB1 million to RMB10 million. With respect to the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million, and with respect to the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, the Trial Measures have come into effect. After March 31, 2023, any failure or perceived failure by the domestic company or PRC subsidiaries to comply with the above confidentiality and archives administration requirements under the Trial Measures and other PRC laws and regulations may result in that the relevant entities would be held legally liable by competent authorities, and referred to the judicial organization to be investigated for criminal liability if suspected of committing a crime.

 

According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies” Article 2 states, “Direct overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by joint-stock company incorporated domestically. Indirect overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by a company in the name of an overseas incorporated entity, whereas the company’s major business operations are located domestically and such offering and listing is based on the underlying equity, assets, earnings or other similar rights of a domestic company”. Accordingly, as the Company believes it is not a joint-stock company incorporated domestically, this offering is not a direct overseas offering and listing by a domestic company. Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The company has taken no actions in regards to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so, and the company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now.

 

According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Regulations on Strengthening the Confidentiality and Archives Management Work Related to the Overseas Issuance and Listing of Securities” Article 3 states, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, documents and materials that contain state secrets or government work secrets, shall first obtain approval from competent authorities according to law, and file with the secrecy administrative department at the same level. Where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a state secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent secrecy administrative department for determination; where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a government work secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent government authority for determination.” Further, Article 4 states that, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, other documents and materials that, if divulged, will jeopardize national security or public interest, shall strictly fulfill relevant procedures stipulated by applicable national regulations.” Accordingly, as the Company does not believe its operations fall into the above legal provisions, the Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities.

 

 

 

Article 15 states, “any overseas offering and listing made by an issuer that meets both the following conditions will be determined as indirect: (1) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year is accounted for by domestic companies; and (2) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in the Chinese Mainland, or its main places of business are located in the Chinese Mainland, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in the Chinese Mainland. The determination as to whether or not an overseas offering and listing by domestic companies is indirect, shall be made on a substance over form basis.” Article 34 states, “For the purpose of this Measures, domestic companies herein refer to companies incorporated within the Chinese Mainland, including domestic join-stock companies whose securities are directly offered and listed overseas and the domestic operating entities of companies whose securities are indirectly offered and listed overseas. Accordingly, the Company believes this offering is an indirect overseas offering by a domestic company.

 

However, Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek pre-authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The Company has taken no actions in regard to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so prior to completion of this offering. The company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now. 

 

The Company will settle amounts owed under the WFOE structure by transferring dividends, or distributions between the holding company and its subsidiaries, or to investors, which have not yet occurred. We intend to rely primarily on dividends paid by the WFOE for our cash needs, including the funds necessary to pay dividends and other cash distributions, if any, to our shareholders, to service any debt we may incur and to pay our operating expenses. The Company has made no such distributions to date nor has it received any distributions from the WFOE to date, and the Company has no current cash management policies in place. The Company will look to implement one in the near future. The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, our WFOE may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to pay distributions from its profits, if any. Furthermore, if our WFOE incurs debt on its own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay distributions or make other payments. If the Company or our subsidiaries are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations, we may be unable to pay dividends on our Shares.

 

Cash dividends, if any, on the Company’s Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If the Company is considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends paid to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

 

There are no legal, arbitral or governmental proceedings, regulatory investigations or other governmental decisions, rulings, orders, or actions before any Governmental Agencies in progress or pending in the PRC to which the Company or the Material PRC Company is a party or to which any assets of the Material PRC Company is a subject.

 

All dividends declared and payable upon the equity interests in the WFOE may be converted into foreign currency and freely transferred out of the PRC free of any deductions in the PRC, provided that (i) the declaration and payment of such dividends complies with applicable PRC Laws and the constitutional documents of the WFOE, and (ii) the remittance of such dividends out of the PRC complies with the procedures required by the relevant PRC Laws relating to foreign exchange administration.

 

We face uncertainties with respect to indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprises by their non-PRC holding companies.

 

 

 

Adverse changes in economic and political policies of the PRC government could have a material and adverse effect on overall economic growth in China, which could materially and adversely affect our business. General macroeconomic conditions may materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, results of operations and financial position. The PRC government’s control over foreign currency conversion may adversely affect our business and results of operations and our ability to remit dividends. PRC regulation of loans to and direct investments in PRC entities by offshore holding companies may delay or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our operating subsidiary in China, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand business.

 

There will be no offer, issuance or sale of the Common Shares made, directly or indirectly, within the PRC. Therefore, a prior approval from the CSRC is not required for the Offering. However, there are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of the M&A Rules, other PRC Laws and future PRC laws and regulations, and there can be no assurance that any Governmental Agency will not take a view that is contrary to or otherwise different from our opinions stated herein. Subject to any applicable administrative procedures required by PRC Laws, and provided that all required Governmental Authorizations have been duly obtained, the due application of the net proceeds to be received by the Company from the issue Common Shares as disclosed in the Prospectus under the caption “Use of Proceeds” does not and immediately after the Offering will not contravene any applicable PRC Laws, the articles of association or the business licenses of the Material PRC Company.

 

There is no tax or duty payable by or on behalf of the Material PRC Company under applicable PRC Laws in connection with the creation, allotment and issuance Common Shares, provided that each person taking the aforementioned actions is not subject to PRC tax by reason of citizenship, permanent establishment, residence or otherwise subject to PRC tax imposed on or measured by net income or net profits.

 

There are no reporting obligations to any Governmental Agency under PRC Laws on those holders of Common Shares who are not deemed to be PRC residents as defined under applicable PRC Laws, to the extent that no reporting obligation is triggered by the purchase or holding of Common Shares under the PRC anti-monopoly laws, rules and regulations.

 

We currently intend to retain all available funds and future earnings, if any, for the operation and expansion of our business and do not anticipate declaring or paying any dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination related to our dividend policy will be made at the discretion of our board of directors after considering our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, contractual requirements, business prospects and other factors the board of directors deem relevant, and subject to the restrictions contained in any future financing instruments.

 

On December 16, 2021, Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) issued a report on its determinations that PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely PCAOB-registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and in Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), because of positions taken by PRC authorities in those jurisdictions. The PCAOB made these determinations pursuant to PCAOB Rule 6100, which provides a framework for how the PCAOB fulfils its responsibilities under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (HFCAA). The report further listed in its Appendix A and Appendix B, Registered Public Accounting Firms Subject to the Mainland China Determination and Registered Public Accounting Firms Subject to the Hong Kong Determination, respectively. The audit report included in this registration statement for the year ended December 31, 2022, was issued by Shandong Haoxin Certified Accountants Co., Ltd. (“HAOXIN”), an audit firm headquartered in PRC, a jurisdiction that the PCAOB has determined that the PCAOB may be unable to conduct inspections or investigate auditors, despite a recent treaty allowing the PCAOB to review the audit papers of firms in the PRC. Our auditors HAOXIN is among those listed by the PCAOB Mainland China Determination, a determination announced by the PCAOB on December 16, 2021 that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in PRC, because of a position taken by one or more authorities in PRC. As a result, we and investors in our common stock may be deprived of the benefits of such full PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors in our stock to lose confidence in our reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.

 

 

 

In addition, under the HFCAA, as amended by the CAA, the Company’s securities may be prohibited from trading on the U.S. stock exchanges or in the over-the-counter trading market in the U.S. if the Company’s auditor is not inspected by the PCAOB for two consecutive years, and this ultimately could result in the Company’s common stock being delisted. Furthermore, on July 19, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“AHFCAA”), which amends the HFCAA and requires the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges or in the over-the-counter trading market in the U.S. if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years. In the future, if we do not engage an auditor that is subject to regular inspection by the PCAOB, our common stocks may be delisted. See “Risk Factors – Risks related to doing business in China – The audit report included in this Amendment is prepared by an auditor who is not inspected by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and as such, the Company’s investors are deprived of the benefits of such inspection. The Company could be delisted if it is unable to timely meet the PCAOB inspection requirements established by the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act.”

 

U.S shareholders may face difficulties in effecting service of process against the Company and officers and director, as one is based in New Zealand and the other is based in China. Even with proper service of process, the enforcement of judgments obtained in U.S. courts or foreign courts based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws would be extremely difficult. Furthermore, there would be added costs and issues with bringing an original action in foreign courts to enforce liabilities based on the U.S. federal securities laws against the Company.

 

Cash dividends, if any, on our Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If we are considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

 

The registered capital of the Material PRC Company has been duly paid in accordance with applicable PRC Laws and their respective articles of association, to the extent that such registered capital is required to be paid prior to the date hereof.

 

All of our business operations are conducted in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects are affected significantly by economic, political and legal developments in China. Although the PRC economy has been transitioning from a planned economy to a more market-oriented economy since the late 1970s, the PRC government continues to exercise significant control over China’s economic growth through direct allocation of resources, monetary and tax policies, and a host of other government policies such as those that encourage or restrict investment in certain industries by foreign investors, control the exchange between the Renminbi and foreign currencies, and regulate the growth of the general or specific market. While the Chinese economy has experienced significant growth in the past 30 years, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. As the PRC economy has become increasingly linked with the global economy, China is affected in various respects by downturns and recessions of major economies around the world. The various economic and policy measures enacted by the PRC government to forestall economic downturns or bolster China’s economic growth could materially affect our business. Any adverse change in the economic conditions in China, in policies of the PRC government or in laws and regulations in China could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of China and market demand for our outsourcing services. Such developments could adversely affect our businesses, lead to reduction in demand for our services and adversely affect our competitive position.

 

The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value. Since the late 1970s, the PRC government has been building a comprehensive system of laws and regulations governing economic matters in general. The overall effect has been to significantly enhance the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. We conduct our business primarily through our WFOE, the WFOE is established in China. These companies are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China. However, since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involves uncertainties, which may limit legal protections available to us. In addition, some regulatory requirements issued by certain PRC government authorities may not be consistently applied by other government authorities (including local government authorities), thus making strict compliance with all regulatory requirements impractical, or in some circumstances impossible. For example, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce the legal protection that we enjoy either by law or contract.

 

An investment in our securities is highly speculative, involves a high degree of risk and should be considered only by persons who can afford the loss of their entire investments. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 15 of this prospectus.

 

NEITHER THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION NOR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION HAS APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED OF THESE SECURITIES OR DETERMINED IF THIS PROSPECTUS IS TRUTHFUL OR COMPLETE. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.

 

Prospectus dated           , 2023

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Prospectus Summary   1
The Offering   9
Risk Factors   15
Use of Proceeds   45
Determination of Offering Price   46
Dilution   47
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations   49
Our Business   60
Management   67
Properties   68
Legal Proceedings   69
Certain Relationships And Related Transactions   72
Description of Share Capital   73
Shares Eligible for Future Sale   75
Plan of Distribution   76
Legal Matters   78
Experts   78
Where You Can Find Additional Information   78
Index to Consolidated Financial Statements   F-1

 

You should rely only on information contained in this prospectus. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with additional information or information different from that contained in this prospectus. Neither the delivery of this prospectus nor the sale of our securities means that the information contained in this prospectus is correct after the date of this prospectus. This prospectus is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy our securities in any circumstances under which the offer or solicitation is unlawful or in any state or other jurisdiction where the offer is not permitted.

 

For investors outside the United States: We have not taken any action that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the securities covered hereby and the distribution of this prospectus outside of the United States.

 

The information in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front cover of this prospectus. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since those dates.

 

No person is authorized in connection with this prospectus to give any information or to make any representations about us, the securities offered hereby or any matter discussed in this prospectus, other than the information and representations contained in this prospectus. If any other information or representation is given or made, such information or representation may not be relied upon as having been authorized by us.

 

We have not done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than the United States. You are required to inform yourself about, and to observe any restrictions relating to, this offering and the distribution of this prospectus.

 

Until October 30, 2023, all dealers that effect transactions in these securities, whether or not participating in this offering, may be required to deliver a prospectus.

 

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Prospectus Summary

 

This summary highlights information that we present more fully elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary does not contain all of the information that you might wish to consider before buying Common Shares in this offering. You should read the entire prospectus carefully, including “Risk Factors” and the financial statements and accompanying notes.

 

Corporate Overview

 

Alpine Auto Brokers (the “Company”) was organized as Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC in the state of Utah in December 2010. The Company sold automobiles and provided dealer services, for a fee.

 

The Company was incorporated as Alpine Auto Brokers, Inc. on May 12, 2011, in the State of Nevada for the purpose of locating and purchasing used vehicles at auctions, from private individuals, from other dealers and selling these vehicles specifically to consumers in Salt Lake City, Utah. On January 1, 2014, the Company acquired 100 percent of the membership interests of Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC, a Utah Limited Liability Company formed on December 10, 2010. The Company operated through its wholly owned subsidiary Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC.

 

The acquisition was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in which the operating entity’s historical financial statements become those of the “accounting acquirer” in which historical operating results are presented from inception.

 

The Company had been dormant since October 27, 2016.

 

On August 18, 2021, the Eight Judicial District Court in Clark County, Nevada Case No: A-20-816619-B appointed Custodian Ventures, managed by David Lazar as the Company’s Receiver.

 

On January 28, 2022, the Company, amended its articles of incorporation change its name back to Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. The change was made because the Company failed to complete its prior name change with FINRA.

 

On February 9, 2022, as a result of a private transactions, 10,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value per share (the “Shares”) of the “Company”, were transferred from Custodian Ventures, LLC to MetaVerse Investment Group (the “Purchaser”). As a result, the Purchaser became the holder of 90% of the voting rights of the issued and outstanding share capital of the Company on a fully-diluted basis of the Company, and became the controlling shareholder. The consideration paid for the Shares was $420,000, with $20,000 being held back pending certain public filings of the Company. The source of the cash consideration for the Shares was personal funds of the Purchaser. In connection with the transaction, David Lazar released the Company from all debts owed to him and/or Custodian Ventures, LLC.

 

On February 9, 2022, the existing director and officer resigned immediately. Accordingly, David Lazar, serving as a director and an officer, ceased to be the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President, Treasurer, Secretary and a Director. At the effective date of the transfer, Zibin Xiao consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on February 9, 2022, Zonghan Wu consented to act as the new CFO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company.

 

On June 27, 2022, Zibin Xiao resigned as the Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on June 27, 2022, Yufeng Zhang consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. As such, the Company recognized the assets and liabilities of NHIL acquired in the reorganization, at their historical carrying amounts.

 

 

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As a result of the above transaction, the Company’s corporate structure which is set forth as follows:

 

 

Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was organized in 2022 to engage in the business of constructing and operating charging stations for electric vehicles (“EV”). Our ambition is to build YDTC into a central participant in this growing industry.

 

In this, our first year of operation, we are focusing our efforts on building a group of consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations. We are undertaking this top-down approach to the industry in part because we lack sufficient financial resources to compete directly with the major participant in the industry. But of equal importance is the opportunity for market impact that we will gain by positioning ourselves as leaders in the charging station industry. As those to whom we provide our services and guidance spread throughout the EV world, they will advertise our brand as their authoritative source for technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry, and so our brand will gain value among the relevant participants in the EV world. Our goal is that, when we have secured the financing necessary to compete in the charging station community, we will already be known and identified with quality and know-how related to charging stations.

 

Our main business at this time, therefore, is to provide consulting services relating to the planning and design of new energy charging piles to customer in Guangdong Province of the PRC. Our customers are enterprises that are either initiating their participation in this industry in general or expanding their operations to Guangdong. In either case, a customer who engages YDTC, will receive, among other things:

 

a survey report on the distribution of new energy charging piles that have been built and are under construction in the district of Guangzhou City in which the customer intends to distribute its stations;,

 

a business plan based upon an analysis of the existing distribution of charging piles in the target market;

 

a site selection plan identifying prospective locations where charging piles can be built;

 

a plan of the electric equipment design plus the type of charging piles to be used;

 

a plan of the construction and the construction method; as well as

 

the design and sample drawings of the foundation for the piles,

 

 

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1. Corporate History and Structure

 

On January 10, 2022, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was incorporated pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On June 16, 2022, Jiayue Yang established a holding company, National Holdings Investment Ltd (NHIL), under the laws of the British Virgin Islands (BVI).

 

On October 04, 2022, NHIL acquired 100% ownership interest in YDTC. YDTC becomes a wholly foreign owned enterprise pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to Jiayue Yang. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

Between June 16, 2022 and October 4, 2022, NHIL was a private company owned by Jiayue Yang, with no assets and no relationship to the Company. Upon acquiring YDTC and before February 20, 2023, NHIL was wholly-owned by Jiayue Yang and held YDTC as a wholly-owned subsidiary.

 

2. Competitive Strengths

 

The following are the competitive strengths of Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Top-down approach: The company’s strategy of targeting consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations is a smart move, as it allows the company to establish itself as a leader in the industry while building its financial resources to compete directly with major participants. This approach will help the company gain valuable insights into the industry while building its brand reputation.

 

Technological and commercial knowledge: YDTC’s focus on providing its clients with technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry positions the company as a credible and authoritative source of information in the EV world. This knowledge base will be useful when the company is ready to enter the market as a direct competitor.

 

Brand reputation: By positioning itself as a leader in the charging station industry through its consulting services, YDTC is laying the foundation for a strong brand reputation. As clients spread the word about the quality of its services, the company’s brand value will increase, making it easier to compete with major players in the industry.

 

Growing industry: The electric vehicle market is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years, and the need for charging stations will increase accordingly. As a company focused solely on charging stations, YDTC is well-positioned to take advantage of this growth and establish itself as a significant player in the industry.

 

Strategic location: Dongguan is a key manufacturing hub in China, and the company’s location there gives it access to a large pool of skilled workers, suppliers, and potential customers. This strategic location could give YDTC an edge over competitors located in less advantageous areas.

 

 

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3. The Charging Station Industry in China

 

In recent decades, China’s rapid economic growth has enabled more and more consumers to buy their own cars. The result has been the creation of the largest automotive market in the world—but also serious urban air pollution, high greenhouse gas emissions, and growing dependence on oil imports. To counteract those troubling trends, the Chinese government has imposed policies to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (Evs). Since buying an EV costs more than buying a conventional internal combustion engine vehicle, in 2009 the government began to provide generous subsidies for EV purchases. As a result, China became the world’s largest market for EV’s, accounting for approximately 50% of global sales. In 2020 1.1 million Evs were produced and sold in China. The central government’s “New Energy Vehicle Industry Development Plan (2021 – 2035) predicted that sales of new energy vehicles would account for 20% of car sales in China in 2025. In fact, during 2022, EV sales represented 22% of new car sales.

 

As the number of EV purchases grew, paying for the subsidies became extremely costly for the government. As a result, beginning in 2020, China’s government began to phase out the subsidies and instead rely on a mandate imposed on car manufacturers. The mandate requires that a certain percent of all vehicles sold by a manufacturer each year must be battery-powered. To avoid financial penalties, every year manufacturers must earn a stipulated number of points, which are awarded for each EV produced based on a complex formula that takes into account range, energy efficiency, performance, and more. The requirements get tougher over time, with a goal of having Evs make up 40% of all car sales in China by 2030.

 

The mandate on vehicle manufacturers to produce Evs is supplemented by a number of Chinese government policies:

 

Tax exemptions. The Chinese government exempts electric vehicles from consumption and sales taxes, which can save purchasers tens of thousands of RMB (equivalent to thousands of dollars). It also waives 50% of vehicle registration fees for electric vehicles.

 

Procurement. The Chinese government also uses its procurement power to promote electric vehicles. A May 2016 order required that half of new vehicles purchased by China’s central government be new energy vehicles within five years.

 

New auto factory requirements. Chinese regulations strongly discourage the construction of factories for manufacturing internal combustion engine vehicles only. Subject to exceptions that are difficult to satisfy, any new vehicle factory is required to include capacity for the construction of electric vehicles.

 

Since Evs will be useless without charging stations, the Chinese central government has promoted the development of EV charging infrastructure as a matter of national policy. As the central government has withdrawn subsidies for purchase of Evs, it has redirected a significant portion of those funds to support the development of EV infrastructure, primarily charging stations. In November 2020, the General Office of the State Council promulgated its “Development Plan of the New Energy Vehicle Industry (2021 – 2035), in which it mandated financial support for the construction of charging stations and proposed preferential policies with respect to allocation of space in parking lots to charging stations. China State Grid and China Southern Grid, China’s two state-owned electric utilities, both have programs to promote the development of electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

Guangdong Province has also been aggressive in support of Evs and EV infrastructure. During 2022 the number of Evs sold in Guangdong Province doubled compared to sales in 2021, and now one-eighth of the Evs manufactured in the PRC are manufactured in Guangdong Province. To support this push toward Evs, Guangdong Province now has more charging stations than any other province in China – and three times as many charging facilities as are located in the entire United States. The Province subsidizes certain purchases of Evs, and encourages insurance companies to provide preferential premiums for Evs. The government of Guangdong Province gives every indication that it will continue to support the expansion of the charging station network indefinitely, with an ultimate goal of maximizing the conversion of vehicular traffic to electric.

 

 

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4. Competition

 

The Company is operating in the growing market of new energy charging piles, which is becoming increasingly competitive due to the growing demand for electric vehicles and the government’s push towards cleaner energy. The competition the Company is facing can be broadly categorized into the following:

 

1. Established players: The new energy charging pile market is already populated with a number of established players such as State Grid, Southern Power Grid, and other major energy companies. These companies have a strong brand presence, financial resources, and expertise in the energy sector. They also have established relationships with customers and are likely to be strong competitors for the Company.

 

2. New entrants: The market for new energy charging piles is attracting a growing number of new entrants, ranging from start-ups to established companies diversifying into the market. These competitors are also likely to be aggressive in pursuing market share and have the potential to disrupt the market.

 

3. Technological changes: The charging technology for electric vehicles is constantly evolving, and competitors are investing heavily in developing new charging technologies such as wireless charging, fast charging, and ultra-fast charging. These technological changes could lead to new entrants and disrupt existing market players.

 

4. Regulatory environment: The regulatory environment for the new energy charging pile market is evolving rapidly, and competitors are likely to be affected by changes in regulations and policies related to the development of the new energy industry. These changes could favor some players and disadvantage others.

 

In summary, the Company is operating in a highly competitive market, facing competition from established players, new entrants, technological changes, and regulatory environment changes. The Company are developing a strong value proposition and endeavoring to build a competitive advantage to succeed in the market.

 

5. Marketing

 

The Company is developing a brand identity that reflects the Company’s values and mission. This includes developing a unique logo, website, and marketing materials that are visually appealing and clearly communicate the Company’s value proposition. The Company also plans to further strengthen our marketing efforts and improve our brand awareness through the following actions:

 

1. Leverage social media: Social media platforms such as WeChat, Weibo, and LinkedIn can be used to build awareness of our brand, share Company news and updates, and engage with potential customers. The Company can also consider partnering with influencers in the electric vehicle or sustainability space to reach a wider audience.

 

2. Attend industry events: The Company will attend industry events such as trade shows, conferences, and seminars to network with potential customers and partners. These events can also provide valuable insights into industry trends and customer needs.

 

3. Foster partnerships: The Company is seeking out partnerships with property developers, government agencies, and other companies in the new energy space. By partnering with these organizations, YDTC can expand its reach and access new customer segments.

 

4. Overall, by developing a brand identity, leveraging social media, attending industry events, and fostering partnerships, The Company can build awareness of its brand and generate leads in the highly competitive market.

 

 

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6. PRC Laws and Regulations Affecting Our Business

 

There are several PRC laws and regulations that could affect the Company’s business, including:

 

Regulations on new energy vehicles: The Chinese government has implemented a number of regulations and policies aimed at promoting the development and adoption of new energy vehicles, including electric vehicles. These policies could create opportunities for the Company as demand for electric vehicle charging infrastructure increases.

 

It is important for YDTC to stay up-to-date with any changes or developments in these and other relevant laws and regulations in order to ensure compliance and mitigate any potential risks or challenges to its business operations.

 

7. Risks Related to Our Business

 

YDTC will face intense competition. It will not achieve market share and customers if it fails to compete effectively.

 

The demand for charging stations in China is strong, and the barriers to entry into the supply market are not great. So there are many enterprises competing to meet the demand. YDTC’s competitors will include international giants such as Tesla, as well as several major Chinese suppliers of charging stations, as well as many low volume suppliers similar to YDTC. Increased competition may adversely affect its margins, market share and brand recognition, or result in significant losses. When YDTC sets prices for energy, it has to consider how competitors have set prices, since electricity is fungible. When they cut prices or offer additional benefits to compete with YDTC, YDTC may have to lower its own prices or offer additional benefits or risk losing market share, either of which could harm our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Some of the competitors will have longer operating histories, greater brand recognition, better supplier relationships, larger customer bases and greater financial, technical and marketing resources than YDTC has. These and other smaller companies may receive investment from or enter into strategic relationships with well-established and well-financed companies or investors, which would help enhance their competitive positions. Some of the competitors may be able to secure more favorable terms from suppliers, devote greater resources to marketing and promotional campaigns, adopt more aggressive pricing policies and devote substantially more resources to their website, mobile application and systems development. We cannot assure you that YDTC will be able to compete successfully against current or future competitors, and competitive pressures may have a material and adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

For more information see Risk Factors below starting on page 15.

 

8. Certain Risks and Limitations Related to Doing Business in China

 

Because our operations are in mainland China, our business is subject to the complex and rapidly evolving laws and regulations. The PRC government may exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business and may intervene in or influence our operations at anytime, which could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our common stock, potentially making it worthless. PRC laws and regulations governing our current business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain. Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system, including uncertainties regarding the enforcement of laws, and sudden or unexpected changes in laws and regulations in China with little advance notice could have a material adverse effect on us and limit the legal protections available to us and our investors. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China

 

 

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Because all of our operations are in China, our business is subject to the complex and rapidly evolving laws and regulations there. The PRC government may exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business and may intervene in or influence our operations at any time, which could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our common stock.” On page 21, “PRC laws and regulations governing our current business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain. Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system, including uncertainties regarding the enforcement of laws, and sudden or unexpected changes in laws and regulations in China with little advance notice could have a material adverse effect on us and limit the legal protections available to you and us.” On page 25, “The approval of and the filing with the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our future offshore offerings under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval or complete such filing.” On page 27, “With the promulgation of the new filing-based administrative rules for overseas offerings by domestic companies in China, the PRC government may exert more oversight and control over overseas public offerings, which could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to of er or continue to offer our common stock to investors and could cause the value of our common stock to significantly decline or become worthless.” On page 30, and “Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies, which could occur quickly with little advance notice, could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.” On page 31 of this prospectus.

 

There are significant enforcement risks related to our common stock. It may be difficult for you to effect service of process or the U.S. courts judgments obtained in U.S. courts upon us or our directors and officers, many of whom are not residents in the United States, and whose significant part of assets are located outside of the United States. In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the PRC would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state. In addition, it is uncertain whether PRC courts would entertain original actions brought in the courts of the Cayman Islands or the PRC against us or such persons predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any State. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China — You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing actions in China against us or our management named in the prospectus.” On page 32 of this prospectus.

 

There are significant liquidity risks related to our common stock and certain limitations on our ability to transfer cash between us or our subsidiaries. In order for us to pay dividends to our shareholders, we may rely on the distribution of profits of the PRC operating entity. PRC regulations currently permit the payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits, as determined in accordance with accounting standards and PRC regulations. To the extent any funds or assets in the business is in mainland China or a mainland China entity, the funds or assets may not be available to fund operations or for other use outside of mainland China, due to the interventions in or the imposition of restrictions and limitations by PRC governments which may limit our ability to transfer funds, pay dividends or make distribution. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China —To the extent any funds or assets in the business is in mainland China or Hong Kong or a mainland China or Hong Kong entity, the funds or assets may not be available to fund operations or for other use outside of mainland China or Hong Kong.” On page 35 of this prospectus. Furthermore, if our subsidiary in mainland China incurs debt on its own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments. In addition, the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementation rules provide that a withholding tax at a rate of 10% will be applicable to dividends payable by companies in mainland China to enterprises outside of mainland China unless reduced under treaties or arrangements between the PRC central government and the governments of other countries or regions where the enterprises outside of mainland China are tax resident.

 

We must remit the of offering proceeds to our PRC operating subsidiary before they may be used to benefit our business in China, the process of which may be time-consuming, and we cannot assure that we can finish all necessary governmental registration processes in a timely manner. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Doing Business in China — We must remit the of offering proceeds to our PRC operating subsidiary before they may be used to benefit our business in China, the process of which may be time-consuming, and we cannot assure that we can finish all necessary governmental registration processes in a timely manner.” On page 36 of this prospectus. In addition, any transfer of funds by us to our PRC subsidiary, either as a shareholder loan or as an increase in registered capital, are subject to approval by or registration or filing with relevant governmental authorities in China. Any foreign loans procured by our PRC subsidiary is required to be registered with China’s State Administration of Foreign Exchange (“SAFE”) in its local branches and satisfy relevant requirements, and our PRC subsidiary may not procure loans which exceed the difference between its respective total project investment amount and registered capital or two times (which may be varied year by year due to the change of PRC’s national macro-control policy) of the net worth of our PRC subsidiary. According to the relevant PRC regulations on foreign-invested enterprises in China, capital contributions to our PRC subsidiary are subject to the registration with State Administration for Market Regulation in its local branches, report submission to the Ministry of Commerce in its local branches and registration with a local bank authorized by SAFE.

 

 

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9. Growth Plan

 

The following is a growth plan for Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Expand consulting services: YDTC should continue to expand its consulting services to attract more clients and establish itself as a top-tier consulting firm in the EV charging station industry. The company can do this by developing and offering new services such as feasibility studies, site selection, and project management.

 

Develop charging station technology: YDTC should invest in research and development to improve the technology used in its charging stations. By developing more efficient, user-friendly, and innovative charging stations, the company can differentiate itself from competitors and attract more clients. Additionally, YDTC could consider developing its own branded charging stations to sell directly to customers.

 

Form strategic partnerships: YDTC should form strategic partnerships with other players in the EV industry, such as EV manufacturers, energy providers, and other charging station companies. These partnerships could provide access to new markets, customers, and technology, as well as help the company to stay up-to-date with the latest industry trends.

 

Raise capital: To fund its expansion plans, YDTC should consider raising capital through various means, such as placement, venture capital, private equity, or debt financing. With adequate funding, YDTC can invest in research and development, expand its operations, and compete with major players in the EV charging station industry.

 

Overall, YDTC’s growth plan should focus on expanding its consulting services, improving its technology, forming strategic partnerships, and raising capital to achieve its goal of becoming a central participant in the growing EV charging station industry.

 

 

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The Offering

 

Common Shares offered   120,000,000 Common Shares, $0.001 par value per share.
     
Common Shares Outstanding before this Offering   455,500,000 shares
     
Common Shares to be Outstanding after this Offering   575,500,000 shares
     
Use of Proceeds;   While there is no minimum number of shares that will be sold in this offering, if we were to sell the entire number of shares registered, we estimate that our net proceeds from this offering will be approximately $1,200,000, based on an initial public offering price of $0.01 per share, after deducting estimated offering expenses. We plan to use the net proceeds of this offering primarily for general corporate purposes, which may include hiring additional sales, marketing and management personnel, and investing in sales and marketing activities, capital expenditures, and other general and administrative matters.
     
    See Use of Proceeds.
     
Minimum number of shares to be sold in this offering.   None.
     
Market for the shares   There is a limited public market for the shares. The shares trade on the OTC Pink Market under the symbol “ALTB.”
     
Risk Factors   Investing in these securities involves a high degree of risk. You should be able to bear a complete loss of your investment and should carefully consider the information set forth in Risk Factors before deciding to invest in our common shares.
     
    Adverse changes in economic and political policies of the PRC government could have a material and adverse effect on overall economic growth in China, which could materially and adversely affect our business. General macroeconomic conditions may materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, results of operations and financial position. The PRC government’s control over foreign currency conversion may adversely affect our business and results of operations and our ability to remit dividends. PRC regulation of loans to and direct investments in PRC entities by offshore holding companies may delay or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our operating subsidiary in China, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand business.
     
    The M&A Rules and certain other PRC regulations may make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions. Under the Enterprise Income Tax Law, we may be classified as a “Resident Enterprise” of China. Such classification will likely result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment. The M&A Rules, among other things, purport to require CSRC approval prior to the listing and trading on an overseas stock exchange of the securities of an offshore special purpose vehicle established or controlled directly or indirectly by the Material PRC Company or individuals and formed for the purpose of overseas listing through the acquisition of PRC domestic interests held by such Material PRC Company or individuals.

 

 

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    We believe that a prior approval from the CSRC may be required for the Offering, but we are seeking an exemption or approval. If we are required to file with the CSRC in accordance with the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, there is also the possibility that we may not be able to complete the filing in a timely manner or at all. There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of the M&A Rules, other PRC Laws and future PRC laws and regulations, and there can be no assurance that any Governmental Agency will not take a view that is contrary to or otherwise different from our opinions stated herein.
     
   

We believe that we are not currently required to obtain approval from Chinese authorities, including the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, or Cybersecurity Administration Committee, or CAC, to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges/quotation servicers or issue securities to foreign investors, however, if we were required to obtain approval in the future and were denied permission from Chinese authorities to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges and/or quotation servicers, we will not be able to continue to be quoted or listed on U.S. exchanges, which would materially affect the interests of the investors. It is uncertain when and whether the Company will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges in the future, and even when such permission is obtained, whether it will be denied or rescinded. Although the Company is currently not required to obtain permission from any of the PRC central or local government to obtain such permission and has not received any denial to list or become quoted on the U.S. exchange, our operations could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future laws and regulations relating to its business or industry; if we inadvertently conclude that such approvals are not required when they are, or applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations change and we are required to obtain approval in the future.

 

On December 24, 2021, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, issued Provisions of the State Council on the Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (Draft for Comments) (the “Administration Provisions”), and the Administrative Measures for the Filing of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Measures”), which were open for public comments by January 23, 2022. The Administration Provisions and Measures for overseas listings lay out specific requirements for filing documents and include unified regulation management, strengthening regulatory coordination, and cross-border regulatory cooperation. Domestic companies seeking to list abroad must carry out relevant security screening procedures if their businesses involve supervisions such as foreign investment security and cyber security reviews. Companies endangering national security are among those off-limits for overseas listings. As the Administration Provisions and Measures have not yet come into effect, we are currently unaffected by them. However, it is uncertain when the Administration Provision and the Measures will take effect or if they will take effect as currently drafted.

 

 

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On February 17, 2023, with the approval of the State Council, the CSRC released the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Trial Measures”) and five supporting guidelines, which will come into effect on March 31, 2023. According to the Trial Measures, among other requirements, (1) domestic companies that seek to offer or list securities overseas, both directly and indirectly, should fulfill the filing procedures with the CSRC; if a domestic company fails to complete the filing procedures, such domestic company may be subject to administrative penalties; and (2) where a domestic company seeks to indirectly offer and list securities in an overseas market, the issuer shall designate a major domestic operating entity responsible for all filing procedures with the CSRC, and such filings shall be submitted to the CSRC within three business days after the submission of the overseas offering and listing application. On the same day, the CSRC also held a press conference for the release of the Trial Measures and issued the Notice on Administration for the Filing of Overseas Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies, which clarifies that (1) on or prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, domestic companies that have already submitted valid applications for overseas offering and listing but have not obtained approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges may reasonably arrange the timing for submitting their filing applications with the CSRC, and must complete the filing before the completion of their overseas offering and listing; (2) a six-month transition period will be granted to domestic companies which, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, have already obtained the approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges, but have not completed the indirect overseas listing; if domestic companies fail to complete the overseas listing within such six-month transition period, they shall file with the CSRC according to the requirements; and (3) the CSRC will solicit opinions from relevant regulatory authorities and complete the filing of the overseas listing of companies with contractual arrangements which duly meet the compliance requirements, and support the development and growth of these companies.

 

With respect to the domestic company, non-compliance with the Trial Measures or an overseas listing completed in breach of it may result in a warning or a fine ranging from RMB 1 million to RMB10 million. Furthermore, the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company may be warned, or fined between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million and the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company may be warned, or fined between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million. If, during the filing process, the domestic company conceals important factors or the content is materially false, and securities are not issued, they are subject to a fine of RMB1 million to RMB10 million. With respect to the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million, and with respect to the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, the Trial Measures have come into effect. After March 31, 2023, any failure or perceived failure by the domestic company or PRC subsidiaries to comply with the above confidentiality and archives administration requirements under the Trial Measures and other PRC laws and regulations may result in that the relevant entities would be held legally liable by competent authorities, and referred to the judicial organization to be investigated for criminal liability if suspected of committing a crime.

 

 

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According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies” Article 2 states, “Direct overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by joint-stock company incorporated domestically. Indirect overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by a company in the name of an overseas incorporated entity, whereas the company’s major business operations are located domestically and such offering and listing is based on the underlying equity, assets, earnings or other similar rights of a domestic company”. Accordingly, as the Company believes it is not a joint-stock company incorporated domestically, this offering is not a direct overseas offering and listing by a domestic company. Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The company has taken no actions in regards to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so, and the company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now.

 

Article 15 states, “any overseas offering and listing made by an issuer that meets both the following conditions will be determined as indirect: (1) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year is accounted for by domestic companies; and (2) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in the Chinese Mainland, or its main places of business are located in the Chinese Mainland, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in the Chinese Mainland. The determination as to whether or not an overseas offering and listing by domestic companies is indirect, shall be made on a substance over form basis.” Article 34 states, “For the purpose of this Measures, domestic companies herein refer to companies incorporated within the Chinese Mainland, including domestic join-stock companies whose securities are directly offered and listed overseas and the domestic operating entities of companies whose securities are indirectly offered and listed overseas. Accordingly, the Company believes this offering is an indirect overseas offering by a domestic company.

 

However, Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek pre-authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The Company has taken no actions in regard to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so prior to completion of this offering. The company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now.

 

 

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According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Regulations on Strengthening the Confidentiality and Archives Management Work Related to the Overseas Issuance and Listing of Securities” Article 3 states, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, documents and materials that contain state secrets or government work secrets, shall first obtain approval from competent authorities according to law, and file with the secrecy administrative department at the same level. Where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a state secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent secrecy administrative department for determination; where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a government work secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent government authority for determination.” Further, Article 4 states that, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, other documents and materials that, if divulged, will jeopardize national security or public interest, shall strictly fulfill relevant procedures stipulated by applicable national regulations.” Accordingly, as the Company does not believe its operations fall into the above legal provisions, the Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities.

 

On December 28, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China (the “CAC”) jointly with the relevant authorities formally published Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) which took effect on February 15, 2022 and replace the former Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2020). Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) stipulates that operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services, and online platform operator (together with the operators of critical information infrastructure, the “Operators”) carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security, shall conduct a cybersecurity review, any online platform operator who controls more than one million users’ personal information must go through a cybersecurity review by the cybersecurity review office if it seeks to be listed in a foreign country. Given that: (i) we do not possess personal information on more than one million users in our business operations; and (ii) data processed in our business does not have a bearing on national security and thus may not be classified as core or important data by the authorities, this offering would not be required to apply for a cybersecurity review under the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021). As a result of the nature of the Company’s operations and size, the Company does not believe that the above is applicable to the Company. Additionally, The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business.

 

At present, we do not believe our operations require the approval and or permission of Chinese authorities. This is because the Company’s business is prefabricated food supply, which we believe does not require the approval and permission of the Chinese government. The “Special Management Measures for Foreign Investment Access (Negative List) (2021 Edition)” and “Market Access Negative List (2022 Edition)” issued by the Chinese government do not include the industry and business the Company is involved in. The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business.

     
    Our WFOE takes invoices settles the Foreign Exchange with the banks, which pay in Renminbi. No transfer, dividend or distribution has been made to the holding company up to now.

 

 

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    Earning Distributions
     
   

We intend to rely primarily on dividends paid by WFOE for our cash needs, including the funds necessary to pay dividends and other cash distributions, if any, to our shareholders, to service any debt we may incur and to pay our operating expenses. The Company settles amounts by transferring dividends, or distributions between the holding company and its subsidiaries, or to investors, which have not yet occurred between any of the above. The Company has made no such distributions to date nor has it received any distributions from the WFOE to date, and the Company has no current cash management policies in place. The Company will look to implement one in the near future. The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, our WFOE may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to pay distributions from its profits, if any. Furthermore, if our WFOE incurs debt on its own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay distributions or make other payments. If the Company or our subsidiaries are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations, we may be unable to pay dividends on our Shares.

 

Cash dividends, if any, on the Company’s Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If the Company is considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends paid to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

     
    Our revenue, net income and cash flow are variable. We may experience fluctuations in our results, including our revenue and net income, from period to period, due to a number of other factors, including changes in the amount of distributions, dividends, or interest paid in respect of investments; changes in our operating expenses; or the degree to which we encounter competition and general economic and market conditions. Such variability in the timing and amount of our accruals may lead to volatility in the trading price of our shares, and, therefore, our results and cash flow for a particular period may not be indicative of our performance in a future period.
     
    The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, we may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from our profits, if any. Furthermore, if our subsidiaries in the PRC incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other payments. If we or our subsidiaries are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations, we may be unable to pay dividends on our Shares.
     
    The payment of dividends by entities organized in the PRC is subject to limitations, procedures and formalities. Regulations in the PRC currently permit payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits as determined in accordance with accounting standards and regulations in China. WFOE is also required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profit based on PRC accounting standards each year to its compulsory reserves fund until the accumulative amount of such reserves reaches 50% of its registered capital.
     
    The transfer to this reserve must be made before distribution of any dividend to shareholders. The surplus reserve fund is non-distributable other than during liquidation and can be used to fund previous years’ losses, if any, and may be utilized for business expansion or converted into share capital by issuing new shares to existing shareholders in proportion to their shareholding or by increasing the par value of the shares currently held by them, provided that the remaining reserve balance after such issue is not less than 25% of the registered capital.
     
    Cash dividends, if any, on our Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If we are considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

 

 

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Risk Factors

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information contained in this report before deciding to invest in our common stock.

 

Risks Related to our Business

 

If we are unable to hire, retain or motivate qualified personnel, consultants, and advisors, we may not be able to grow effectively.

 

At the present time, we have only two employees: our management team. Our ability to grow as a public company will be largely dependent on our ability to recruit highly skilled individuals. Future success depends on our continuing ability to identify, hire, develop, motivate and retain highly qualified personnel for all areas of our organization. Competition for such qualified employees is intense. If we do not succeed in attracting excellent personnel or in retaining or motivating them, we may be unable to grow effectively. In addition, all future success depends largely on our ability to retain key consultants and advisors. We cannot assure that any skilled individuals will agree to become an employee or consultant for the Company. Our inability to retain their services could negatively impact our business and our ability to execute our business strategy.

 

We may not be able to obtain additional funding to meet our requirements.

 

Our ability to enter into the business of constructing and distributing EV charging stations depends upon our ability to obtain financing through equity financing, debt financing (including credit facilities) or the sale or syndication of some or all of our interests in certain projects or other assets. If our access to existing credit facilities is not available, and if other funding does not become available, there could be a material adverse effect on our business.

 

The EV charging market is characterized by rapid technological change, which requires YDTC to continue to develop new products and product innovations. Any delays in such development could adversely affect market adoption of its products and YDTC’s financial results.

 

Continuing technological changes in battery and other EV technologies could adversely affect adoption of current EV charging technology and/or YDTC’s products. YDTC’s future success will depend upon its ability to develop and introduce a variety of new product offerings to address the changing needs of the EV charging market. As new products are introduced, gross margins tend to decline in the near term and improve as the product become more mature and with a more efficient manufacturing process.

 

As EV technologies change, YDTC may need to upgrade or adapt its charging station technology and introduce new products and services in order to serve vehicles that have the latest technology, in particular battery cell technology, which could involve substantial costs. Even if YDTC is able to keep pace with changes in technology and develop new products and services, its research and development expenses could increase, its gross margins could be adversely affected in some periods and its prior products could become obsolete more quickly than expected.

 

If YDTC is unable to devote adequate resources to develop products or cannot otherwise successfully develop products or services that meet customer requirements on a timely basis or that remain competitive with technological alternatives, its products and services could lose market share, its revenue will decline, it may experience higher operating losses and its business and prospects will be adversely affected.

 

Our success depends on our personnel. Loss of key personnel may adversely affect our business.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent on the performance of our management personnel. In particular, we will depend on the services of key persons. The loss of the services of key persons could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results and financial condition.

 

15

 

If we are unable to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, the accuracy and timeliness of our financial reporting may be adversely affected. In addition, because of our status as a smaller reporting company, you will not be able to depend on any attestation from our independent registered public accounting firm as to our internal control over financial reporting for the foreseeable future.

 

When we become a reporting company, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we assess disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In particular, as a public company, we will be required to perform system and process evaluations and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, as required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We will be required to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for the first fiscal year beginning after the effective date of this offering. However, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act until the later of the year following our first annual report required to be filed with the SEC or the date we are no longer an “smaller reporting company” as defined in the JOBS Act. Accordingly, you will not be able to depend on any attestation concerning our internal control over financial reporting from our independent registered public accounting firm for the foreseeable future.

 

Our senior management lacks experience in managing a public company and complying with laws applicable to operating as a U.S. public company domiciled in the Nevada, and failure to comply with such obligations could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Prior to the completion of this offering, YDTC has been operated as a private company located in China. In connection with this offering, we acquired our company, ALTB, and NHIL, and YDTC, our subsidiary in China. In the process of taking these steps to prepare our company for this initial public offering, senior management of YDTC became the senior management of our company. None of senior management of our company has experience managing a public company or managing a Nevada company.

 

As a result of this offering, our company will become subject to laws, regulations and obligations that do not currently apply to it, such as the Exchange Act of 1934, and our senior management currently has no experience in complying with such laws, regulations and obligations. The senior management is only experienced in operating the business of YDTC in compliance with PRC laws. However, by virtue of this offering, our company will be required to file annual and current reports with the SEC in compliance with U.S. securities and other laws. These obligations can be burdensome and complicated, and failure to comply with such obligations could have a material adverse effect on our company.

 

The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) issued a report on its determinations that the Board is unable to inspect or investigate completely PCAOB-registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and in Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), because of positions taken by PRC authorities in those jurisdictions. The Board made these determinations pursuant to PCAOB Rule 6100, which provides a framework for how the PCAOB fulfils its responsibilities under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (HFCAA).

 

To protect investors and to carry out the PCAOB’s mandate, our inspectors and investigators need consistent access across all jurisdictions to the audit work performed for public companies in U.S. capital markets. Rule 6100 sets forth three factors that together reflect the access the PCAOB needs to completely execute its statutory mandate with respect to its inspections and investigations. The PCAOB’s determination report provides the PCAOB’s assessment of these factors based on positions taken by PRC authorities. As discussed in the report, PRC authorities assert that access by the Board to audit work papers and related information can be provided only under a cooperative agreement, but they persistently have taken positions that prevent the finalization of, or their full performance under, such agreements.

 

The PCAOB has issued its determination report to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which also has responsibilities under the HFCAA. The appendices to the report identify the PCAOB-registered firms subject to the determinations. Under Rule 6100, the Board will reassess its determinations at least annually.

 

16

 

We may not be able to obtain additional funding to meet our requirements.

 

Our ability to maintain and expand our development and production of EV products to cover our general and administrative expenses depends upon our ability to obtain financing through equity financing, debt financing (including credit facilities) or the sale or syndication of some or all of our interests in certain projects or other assets. If our access to existing credit facilities is not available, and if other funding does not become available, there could be a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Our success depends on our personnel. Loss of key personnel may adversely affect our business.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent on the performance of our management personnel. In particular, we will depend on the services of such personnel as Yufeng Zhang, President, CEO, and Treasurer. The loss of the services of key persons could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results and financial condition. We will also be dependent on the officers and directors of ALTB to raise capital.

 

Our operating results depend on product costs, public tastes and promotion success.

 

We expect to generate our future revenue from brand operation and management services. Our future revenues will depend upon the timing and the level of market acceptance of our services, as well as upon our fees. The revenues derived from our services depend primarily on the acceptance by the public, which cannot be predicted and does not necessarily bear a direct correlation to the services provided.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may be subject to litigation and/or costly remediation and the price of our Common Stock may be adversely affected.

 

Failure to establish the required internal controls or procedures over financial reporting, or any failure of those controls or procedures once established, could adversely impact our public disclosures regarding our business, financial condition or results of operations. Upon review of the required internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures, our management and/or our auditors may identify material weaknesses and/or significant deficiencies that need to be addressed. Any actual or perceived weaknesses or conditions that need to be addressed in our internal control over financial reporting, disclosure of management’s assessment of its internal control over financial reporting or disclosure of our public accounting firm’s attestation to or report on management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting could adversely impact the price of our Common Stock and may lead to claims against us.

 

Global economic conditions, such as COVID-19, may adversely affect our industry, business and results of operations.

 

Our overall performance depends, in part, on worldwide economic conditions which historically is cyclical in character. Key international economies continue to be impacted by a recession, characterized by falling demand for a variety of goods and services, restricted credit, going concern threats to financial institutions, major multinational companies and medium and small businesses, poor liquidity, declining asset values, reduced corporate profitability, extreme volatility in credit, equity and foreign exchange markets and bankruptcies. By way of example, the automotive aftermarket, specifically fuel saving add-ons such as light-truck tonneau covers, is typically not as affected by economic slow-down or recession as other industries or market segments. In markets where our sales occur and go into recession, these conditions affect the rate of spending and could adversely affect our customers’ ability or willingness to purchase our products, and delay prospective customers’ purchasing decisions, all of which could adversely affect our operating results. In addition, in a weakened economy, companies that have competing products may reduce prices which could also reduce our average selling prices and harm our operating results.

 

Any further disruptions from an uptick in new infections related to COVID-19 may materially harm out business prospects.

 

Further upticks in infection, and the related enforcement of governmental restrictions would materially hinder our ability to grow, as it would make it could interrupt our supply chain, as well as the financial condition of our intended customer base.

 

Concentration of Ownership in Certain Individuals may allow such Shareholders to Control the Company’s Business

 

Zonghan Wu controls eight-eight percent (88%) of the voting stock of the Company outstanding. Following the offering, Zonghan Wu will still hold a majority of the interest of the Company. As a result, Zonghan Wu will be able to exercise control over virtually all matters requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporation transactions. Thus, Zonghan Wu will be able to maintain their positions and effectively operate the Company’s business, regardless of other investors’ preferences.

 

17

 

Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure

 

U.S. Investors face added risks from the Company’s classification as a foreign private issuer.

 

Subject to the requirements and public policy considerations as stipulated under applicable PRC Laws relating to the enforceability of foreign court judgments, submission to foreign jurisdiction for dispute resolution and choice of law, and also subject to the conditions described under the caption “Enforceability of Civil Liabilities” in the Registration Statement and Prospectus, (i) the irrevocable submission of the Company to the jurisdiction of any courts in the United States, the waiver by the Company of any objection to the venue of a proceeding in any such court, the waiver and agreement not to plead an inconvenient forum, the waiver of sovereign immunity

 

Under PRC Laws, neither the Material PRC Company, nor their respective properties, assets or revenues, are entitled to any right of immunity on the grounds of sovereignty or otherwise from any legal action, suit or proceeding, from set-off or counterclaim, from the jurisdiction of any court, from services of process, from attachment prior to or in aid of execution of any judgment, or from other legal processes or proceedings for the giving of any relief or for the enforcement of any judgment.

 

The Company’s principal executive offices and our officers and directors are located outside of the United States. This could make the enforcement and/or service of process of a shareholder claim or judgment difficult.

 

U.S shareholders may face difficulties in effecting service of process against the Company and our officers and director. Even with proper service of process, the enforcement of judgments obtained in U.S. courts or foreign courts based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws would be extremely difficult. Furthermore, there would be added costs and issues with bringing an original action in foreign courts to enforce liabilities based on the U.S. federal securities laws against the Company or its officers and directors, and they still may be fruitless.

 

We are faced with risks and uncertainties as a foreign enterprise under PRC laws.

 

As a company incorporated under the laws of Nevada, we are classified as a foreign enterprise under PRC laws and regulations, and our wholly-owned PRC subsidiary, YDTC, is a foreign-invested enterprise, or a FIE.

 

Substantial uncertainties exist with respect to the enactment timetable, interpretation and implementation of draft PRC Foreign Investment Law and how it may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

 

The Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China (“MOFCOM”) published a discussion draft of the proposed Foreign Investment law (“Draft Foreign Investment Law”) in January 2015 aiming to, upon enactment, replace the existing laws regulating foreign investment in China, namely, the Sino-Foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, the Sino-Foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law, and the Wholly Foreign-Invested Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. The MOFCOM is currently soliciting comments on this draft and substantial uncertainties exist with respect to its enactment timetable, interpretation and implementation. The Draft Foreign Investment Law, if enacted as proposed, may materially impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance, and business operation.

 

Among other things, the Draft Foreign Investment Law expands the definition of foreign investment and introduces the principle of “actual control” in determining whether a company is considered a FIE. Once an entity is determined to be an FIE, it will be subject to the foreign investment restrictions or prohibitions set forth in a “negative list,” which is classified into the “catalogue of prohibitions” and “catalogue of restrictions,” to be separately issued by the State Council later. Foreign investors are not allowed to invest in any sector set forth in the catalogue of prohibitions. If the FIE is engaged in the industry listed in the catalogue of restrictions, it needs market entry clearance by the MOFCOM. Otherwise, prior approval from governmental authorities as mandated by the existing foreign investment legal regime would no longer be required for establishment of the FIE.

 

18

 

We rely on dividends paid by WFOE for our cash needs.

 

We intend to rely primarily on dividends paid by WFOE for our cash needs, including the funds necessary to pay dividends and other cash distributions, if any, to our shareholders, to service any debt we may incur and to pay our operating expenses. The payment of dividends by entities organized in the PRC is subject to limitations as described herein. Under Nevada law, we may pay dividends from legally available realized and unrealized profits of the Company, and/or its share premium account and/or as otherwise permitted by the Companies Act, provided that we must be solvent before and after the dividend payment in the sense that we will be able to pay our debts as they become due in the ordinary course of business. If we determine to pay dividends on any of our common shares in the future, as a holding company, we will be dependent on receipt of funds from WFOE.

 

Pursuant to the Implementation Rules for the new Chinese enterprise income tax law, effective on January 1, 2008, dividends payable by a foreign investment entity to its foreign investors are subject to a withholding tax of up to 10%. Pursuant to Article 10 of the Arrangement Between the Mainland of China and the Hong Kong Special Administration Region for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to Taxes on Income effective December 8, 2006, dividends payable by a foreign investment entity to its Hong Kong investor who owns 25% or more of the equity of the foreign investment entity is subject to a withholding tax of up to 5%.

 

The payment of dividends by entities organized in the PRC is subject to limitations, procedures and formalities. Regulations in the PRC currently permit payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits as determined in accordance with accounting standards and regulations in China. WFOE is also required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profit based on PRC accounting standards each year to its compulsory reserves fund until the accumulative amount of such reserves reaches 50% of its registered capital.

 

The transfer to this reserve must be made before distribution of any dividend to shareholders. The surplus reserve fund is non-distributable other than during liquidation and can be used to fund previous years’ losses, if any, and may be utilized for business expansion or converted into share capital by issuing new shares to existing shareholders in proportion to their shareholding or by increasing the par value of the shares currently held by them, provided that the remaining reserve balance after such issue is not less than 25% of the registered capital.

 

We may be exposed to potential risks relating to our internal control over financial reporting.

 

We have limited accounting personnel and other resources with which to address our internal controls and procedures. Our management has not completed an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, and our independent registered public accounting firm has not conducted an audit of our internal control over financial reporting. In the course of reviewing our consolidated financial statements, we identified several material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and other control deficiencies. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

The material weaknesses identified to date relate to (i) a lack of accounting staff and resources with appropriate knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“US GAAP”) and SEC reporting and compliance requirements; (ii) a lack of sufficient documented financial closing policies and procedures; (iii) a lack of independent directors and an audit committee; (iv) lack of risk assessment in accordance with the requirement of COSO 2013 framework and (v) a lack of an effective review process by the accounting manager which led to material audit adjustments to the financial statements.

 

Following the identification of the material weaknesses and control deficiencies, we plan to continue to take remedial measures including (i) hiring more qualified accounting personnel with relevant US GAAP and SEC reporting experience and qualifications to strengthen the financial reporting function and to set up a financial and system control framework; (ii) implementing regular and continuous US GAAP accounting and financial reporting training programs for our accounting and financial reporting personnel; (iii) setting up an internal audit function as well as engaging an external consulting firm to assist us with assessment of Sarbanes-Oxley compliance requirements and improvement of overall internal control; and (iv) appointing independent directors, establishing an audit committee, and strengthening corporate governance.

 

19

 

We plan to take measures to remedy these material weaknesses depending on our resources. The implementation of these measures may not fully address the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, and we cannot conclude that they have been fully remedied. Our failure to correct theses material weaknesses or our failure to discover and address any other material weaknesses could result in inaccuracies in our financial statements and could also impair our ability to comply with applicable financial reporting requirements and related regulatory filings on a timely basis. As a result, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, as well as the trading price of our Common stock, may be materially and adversely affected. Moreover, ineffective internal control over financial reporting significantly hinders our ability to prevent fraud. Upon the completion of this offering, we will become a public company in the United States subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, will require that we include a report from management on our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report on Form 20-F beginning with our annual report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022. In addition, once we cease to be an “emerging growth company” as such term is defined in the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm must attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Our management may conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is not effective. Moreover, even if our management concludes that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, our independent registered public accounting firm, after conducting its own independent testing, may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. In addition, our reporting obligations may place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources and systems for the foreseeable future. We may be unable to timely complete our evaluation testing and any required remediation.

 

20

 

Risks Related to Doing Business in China

 

Because all of our operations are in China, our business is subject to the complex and rapidly evolving laws and regulations there. The PRC government may exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business and may intervene in or influence our operations at any time, which could result in a material change in our operations and/or the value of our common stock.

 

As a business operating in the PRC, we are subject to the laws and regulations of the PRC, which can be complex and evolve rapidly. The PRC government has the power to exercise significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business, and the regulations to which we are subject may change rapidly and with little notice to us or our shareholders. As a result, the application, interpretation, and enforcement of new and existing laws and regulations in the PRC are often uncertain. In addition, these laws and regulations may be interpreted and applied inconsistently by different agencies or authorities, and inconsistently with our current policies and practices. New laws, regulations, and other government directives in the PRC may also be costly to comply with, and such compliance or any associated inquiries or investigations or any other government actions may:

 

Delay or impede our development,

 

Result in negative publicity or increase our operating costs,

 

Require significant management time and attention, and

 

Subject us to remedies, administrative penalties and even criminal liabilities that may harm our business, including fines assessed for our current or historical operations, or demands or orders that we modify or even cease our business practices.

 

The promulgation of new laws or regulations, or the new interpretation of existing laws and regulations, in each case that restrict or otherwise unfavorably impact the ability or manner in which we conduct our business and could require us to change certain aspects of our business to ensure compliance, which could decrease demand for our services, reduce revenues, increase costs, require us to obtain more licenses, permits, approvals or certificates, or subject us to additional liabilities. To the extent any new or more stringent measures are required to be implemented, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected as well as materially decrease the value of our common stock.

 

Furthermore, if the PRC government determines that our corporate structure does not comply with PRC regulations, or if these regulations change or are interpreted differently in the future, our common stock may decline significantly in value or become worthless if the determinations, changes or interpretations result in impermissibility of our corporate structure and our inability to assert control over the assets of our PRC subsidiary that accordingly conduct all or substantially all of our operations.

 

The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy. Our ability to operate in China may be harmed by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to customer rights, taxation, employment, property and other matters. The central or local governments of China may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our compliance with such regulations or interpretations. Accordingly, government actions in the future, including any decision not to continue to support recent economic reforms and to return to a more centrally planned economy or regional or local variations in the implementation of economic policies, could have a significant effect on economic conditions in China or particular regions thereof, and could require us to divest ourselves of any interest we then hold in Chinese properties. Given recent statements by the Chinese government indicating an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, any such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

21

 

Recently, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the Opinions on Severely Cracking Down on Illegal Securities Activities According to Law, or the Opinions, which was made available to the public on July 6, 2021. The Opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities, and the need to strengthen the supervision over overseas listings by Chinese companies. Effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems, will be taken to deal with the risks and incidents of China-concept overseas listed companies. Such future administrative measure or actions may have material adverse effects on the offering of our securities to investors, our proposed listing in the U.S. or our business operation, for example in the event that it is required that we should obtain permission from the Chinese government to offer our securities to investors or list on U.S. exchanges, it is unpredictable whether such permission can be obtained by us, as the case may be, or, if permission is obtained, whether it could be later denied or rescinded. If we, including our subsidiaries, do not receive or maintain such permissions or approvals, or inadvertently conclude that such permissions or approvals are not required, it could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities to investors, list in the U.S. and cause the value of our securities to significantly decline or become worthless. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions from PRC government authorities in connection with the Opinions.

 

On June 10, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China (the “SCNPC”), promulgated the PRC Data Security Law, which took effect in September 2021. The PRC Data Security Law imposes data security and privacy obligations on entities and individuals carrying out data activities, and introduces a data classification and hierarchical protection system based on the importance of data in economic and social development, and the degree of harm it will cause to national security, public interests, or legitimate rights and interests of individuals or organizations when such data is tampered with, destroyed, leaked, illegally acquired or used. The PRC Data Security Law also provides for a national security review procedure for data activities that may affect national security and imposes export restrictions on certain data an information.

 

In early July 2021, regulatory authorities in China launched cybersecurity investigations with regard to several China-based companies that are listed in the United States. In July 2021, the Chinese cybersecurity regulator launched the investigation on three Internet platforms.

 

On November 14, 2021, the CAC released the Regulations on the Network Data Security Management (Draft for Comments) (the “Data Security Management Regulations Draft”), to solicit public opinion and comments. Pursuant to the Data Security Management Regulations Draft, data processor holding more than one million users’ individual information shall be subject to cybersecurity review before listing abroad. Data processing activities refers to activities such as the collection, retention, use, processing, transmission, provision, disclosure, or deletion of data. According to the latest amended Cybersecurity Review Measures, which was promulgated on December 28, 2021 and became effective on February 15, 2022, and replaced the Cybersecurity Review Measures promulgated on April 13, 2020, online platform operator holding more than one million users’ individual information shall be subject to cybersecurity review before listing abroad. Since the Cybersecurity Review Measures is new, the implementation and interpretation thereof is not yet clear. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not been informed by any PRC governmental authority of any requirement that we file for approval for this offering.

 

On July 30, 2021, the State Council promulgated the Regulations on the Protection of the Security of Critical Information Infrastructure, or the Regulations, which took effect on September 1, 2021. The Regulations supplement and specify the provisions on the security of critical information infrastructure as stated in the Cybersecurity Review Measures. The Regulations provide, among others, that protection department of certain industry or sector shall notify the operator of the critical information infrastructure in time after the identification of certain critical information infrastructure. On August 20, 2021, the SCNPC promulgated the Personal Information Protection Law of the PRC, or the Personal Information Protection Law, which took effect in November 2021. As the first systematic and comprehensive law specifically for the protection of personal information in the PRC, the Personal Information Protection Law provides, among others, that (i) an individual’s consent shall be obtained to use sensitive personal information, such as biometric characteristics and individual location tracking, (ii) personal information operators using sensitive personal information shall notify individuals of the necessity of such use and impact on the individual’s rights, and (iii) where personal information operators reject an individual’s request to exercise his or her rights, the individual may file a lawsuit with a People’s Court.

 

22

 

On February 17, 2023, the CSRC issued the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, which became effective on March 31, 2023. According to the new administrative rules, among other things, a domestic company in the PRC that seeks to offer and list securities in overseas markets shall fulfill the filing procedure with the CSRC as per requirement thereof. Initial public offerings or listings in overseas markets shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the relevant application is submitted overseas. If an issuer offers securities in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities subsequently, filings shall be made with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. Upon occurrence of any material event, such as change of control, investigations or sanctions imposed by overseas securities regulatory agencies or other relevant competent authorities, change of listing status or transfer of listing segment, or voluntary or mandatory delisting, after an issuer has offered and listed securities in an overseas market, the issuer shall submit a report thereof to CSRC within 3 working days after the occurrence and public disclosure of such event. Further, an overseas securities company that serves as a sponsor or lead underwriter for overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies shall file with the CSRC within 10 working days after signing its first engagement agreement for such business, and submit to the CSRC, no later than January 31 each year, an annual report on its business activities in the previous year associated with overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies. If an overseas securities company has entered into engagement agreements before the effectuation of the Trial Administrative Measures and is serving in practice as a sponsor or lead underwriter for overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies, it shall file with the CSRC within 30 working days after the Trial Administrative Measures take effect.

 

On February 24, 2023, the CSRC promulgated the Provisions on Strengthening Confidentiality and Archives Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Confidentiality and Archives Administration Provisions”), which will also become effective on March 31, 2023. The Confidentiality and Archives Administration Provisions set out rules, requirements and procedures relating to provision of documents, materials and accounting archives for securities companies, securities service providers, overseas regulators and other entities and individuals in connection with overseas offering and listing, including without limitation to, domestic companies that carry out overseas offering and listing (either in direct or indirect means) and the securities companies and securities service providers (either incorporated domestically or overseas) that undertake relevant businesses shall not leak any state secret and working secret of government agencies, or harm national security and public interest, and a domestic company shall first obtain approval from competent authorities according to law, and file with the secrecy administrative department at the same level, if it plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide any documents and materials that contain state secrets or working secrets of government agencies. Working papers produced in the Chinese mainland by securities companies and securities service providers in the process of undertaking businesses related to overseas offering and listing by domestic companies shall be retained in the Chinese mainland. Where such documents need to be transferred or transmitted to outside the Chinese mainland, relevant approval procedures stipulated by regulations shall be followed.

 

Our business may be subject to a variety of PRC laws and other obligations regarding cybersecurity and data protection.

 

Our business may be subject to PRC laws relating to the collection, use, sharing, retention, security, and transfer of confidential and private information, such as personal information and other data. These laws continue to develop, and the PRC government may adopt other rules and restrictions in the future. Non-compliance could result in penalties or other significant legal liabilities.

 

Pursuant to the PRC Cybersecurity Law, which was promulgated by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on November 7, 2016 and took effect on June 1, 2017, personal information and important data collected and generated by a critical information infrastructure operator in the course of its operations in China must be stored in China, and if a critical information infrastructure operator purchases internet products and services that affects or may affect national security, it should be subject to cybersecurity review by the Cyberspace Administration of China (“CAC”). Due to the lack of further interpretations, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operator” remains unclear.

 

23

 

On April 13, 2020, twelve Chinese government agencies jointly promulgated the Measures for Cybersecurity Review, which became effective on June 1, 2020, set forth the cybersecurity review mechanism for critical information infrastructure operators, and provided that critical information infrastructure operators who intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security shall be subject to a cybersecurity review. On June 10, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress promulgated the PRC Data Security Law, which will take effect in September 2021. The Data Security Law provides for a security review procedure for the data activities that may affect national security. Moreover, the State Internet Information Office issued the Measures of Cybersecurity Review (Revised Draft for Comments, not yet effective) on July 10, 2021, which requires operators with personal information of more than 1 million users who want to list abroad to file a cybersecurity review with the CAC. Furthermore, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the Opinions on Severe and Lawful Crackdown on Illegal Securities Activities, which was available to the public on July 6, 2021. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies. These opinions proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems, to deal with the risks and incidents facing China-based overseas-listed companies and the demand for cybersecurity and data privacy protection. As these laws, opinions and the draft measures were recently issued, official guidance and interpretation of these remain unclear in several respects at this time, and the PRC government authorities may have wide discretion in the interpretation and enforcement of these laws, opinions and the draft measures. Therefore, it is uncertain whether the future regulatory changes would impose additional restrictions on our business.

 

The Data Security Law also sets forth the data security protection obligations for entities and individuals handling personal data, including that no entity or individual may acquire such data by stealing or other illegal means, and the collection and use of such data should not exceed the necessary limits The costs of compliance with, and other burdens imposed by, PRC Cybersecurity Law and any other cybersecurity and related laws may limit the use and adoption of our products and services and could have an adverse impact on our business. Further, if the enacted version of the Measures for Cybersecurity Review mandates clearance of cybersecurity review and other specific actions to be completed by companies like us, we face uncertainties as to whether such clearance can be timely obtained, or at all.

 

We are not be subject to the cybersecurity review by the CAC for this offering, given that: (i) our products and services are offered not directly to individual users but through our institutional customers; (ii) we do not possess a large amount of personal information in our business operations; and (iii) data processed in our business does not have a bearing on national security and thus may not be classified as core or important data by the authorities. As a result of the nature of the Company’s operations and size, the Company does not believe that the above is applicable to the Company. Additionally, The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business.

 

However, there remains uncertainty as to how the Draft Measures will be interpreted or implemented and whether the PRC regulatory agencies, including the CAC, may adopt new laws, regulations, rules, or detailed implementation and interpretation related to the Draft Measures. If any such new laws, regulations, rules, or implementation and interpretation comes into effect, we will take all reasonable measures and actions to comply and to minimize the adverse effect of such laws on us.

 

We cannot assure you that PRC regulatory agencies, including the CAC, would take the same view as we do, and there is no assurance that we can fully or timely comply with such laws. In the event that we are subject to any mandatory cybersecurity review and other specific actions required by the CAC, we face uncertainty as to whether any clearance or other required actions can be timely completed, or at all. Given such uncertainty, we may be further required to suspend our relevant business, shut down our website, or face other penalties, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

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PRC laws and regulations governing our current business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain. Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system, including uncertainties regarding the enforcement of laws, and sudden or unexpected changes in laws and regulations in China with little advance notice could have a material adverse effect on us and limit the legal protections available to you and us.

 

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations including, but not limited to, the laws and regulations governing our business and the enforcement and performance of our arrangements with clients in certain circumstances. The laws and regulations are sometimes vague and may be subject to future changes, and their official interpretation and enforcement could be unpredictable, with little advance notice. The effectiveness and interpretation of newly enacted laws or regulations, including amendments to existing laws and regulations, may be delayed, and our business may be affected if we rely on laws and regulations which are subsequently adopted or interpreted in a manner different from our current understanding of these laws and regulations. New laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively. We cannot predict what effect the interpretation of existing or new PRC laws or regulations may have on our business.

 

The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions are encouraged to be used for reference but it remains unclear to what extent the prior court decisions may impact the current court ruling as the encouragement policy is new and there is limited judicial practice in this regard. We conduct our business primarily through our subsidiary established in China.

 

This subsidiary is generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China. However, since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involves uncertainties, which may limit legal protections available to us. In addition, any new or changes in PRC laws and regulations related to foreign investment in China could affect the business environment and our ability to operate our business in China. Recently, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the “Opinions on Severely Cracking Down on Illegal Securities Activities According to Law,” or the Opinions, which was made available to the public on July 6, 2021. The Opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities, and the need to strengthen the supervision over overseas listings by Chinese companies. Effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems will be taken to deal with the risks and incidents of China-concept overseas listed companies, and cybersecurity and data privacy protection requirements, etc. The Opinions and any related implementing rules to be enacted may subject us to compliance requirement in the future. In addition, some regulatory requirements issued by certain PRC government authorities may not be consistently applied by other government authorities (including local government authorities), thus making strict compliance with all regulatory requirements impractical, or in some circumstances impossible. For example, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce the legal protection that we enjoy either by law or contract. However, since PRC administrative and court authorities have discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to predict the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. These uncertainties may impede our ability to enforce the contracts we have entered into with our business partners, clients and suppliers. In addition, such uncertainties, including any inability to enforce our contracts, together with any development or interpretation of PRC law that is adverse to us, could materially and adversely affect our business and operations. Furthermore, intellectual property rights and confidentiality protections in China may not be as effective as in the United States or other more developed countries and the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all and may have retroactive effects. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of any of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such unpredictability towards our contractual, property, and procedural rights could adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations. We cannot predict the effect of future developments in the PRC legal system, including the promulgation of new laws, changes to existing laws or the interpretation or enforcement thereof, or the preemption of local regulations by national laws. These uncertainties could limit the legal protections available to us and other foreign investors, including you. In addition, any litigation in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of our resources and management attention.

 

The PRC government has significant oversight and discretion over the conduct of our business and may intervene or influence our operations as the government deems appropriate to further regulatory, political and societal goals. The PRC government has recently published new policies that significantly affected certain industries such as the education and internet industries, and we cannot rule out the possibility that it will in the future release regulations or policies regarding our industry that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Furthermore, if China adopts more stringent standards with respect to certain areas such as corporate social responsibilities, we may incur increased compliance costs or become subject to additional restrictions in our operations. We cannot predict the effects of future developments in the PRC legal system on our business operations, including the promulgation of new laws, or changes to existing laws or the interpretation or enforcement thereof. These uncertainties could limit the legal protections available to us and our investors, including you.

 

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Recent greater oversight by the CAC over data security, particularly for companies seeking to list on a foreign exchange, could adversely impact our business and our proposed offering.

 

On December 28, 2021, the CAC, together with 12 other governmental departments of the PRC, jointly promulgated the Cybersecurity Review Measures, which became on February 15, 2022. The Cybersecurity Review Measures provides that, in addition to critical information infrastructure operators that intend to purchase Internet products and services, data processing operators engaging in data processing activities that affect or may affect national security must be subject to cybersecurity review by the Cybersecurity Review Office of the PRC. According to the Cybersecurity Review Measures, a cybersecurity review assesses potential national security risks that may be brought about by any procurement, data processing, or overseas listing. The Cybersecurity Review Measures further requires that critical information infrastructure operators and data processing operators that possess personal data of at least one million users must apply for a review by the Cybersecurity Review Office of the PRC before conducting listings in foreign countries.

 

On November 14, 2021, the CAC published the Data Security Management Regulations Draft, which provides that data processing operators engaging in data processing activities that affect or may affect national security must be subject to network data security review by the relevant Cyberspace Administration of the PRC. According to the Data Security Management Regulations Draft, data processing operators who possess personal data of at least one million users or collect data that affects or may affect national security must be subject to network data security review by the relevant Cyberspace Administration of the PRC. The deadline for public comments on the Data Security Management Regulations Draft was December 13, 2021. On July 7, 2022, the CAC promulgated the Measures for the Security Assessment of Outbound Data Transfers, or the Measures, which will become effective from September 1, 2022. The Measures shall apply to the security assessment of the provision of important data and personal information collected and generated by data processors in the course of their operations within the territory of the PRC by such data processors to overseas recipients. The Measures stipulates the circumstances under which security assessment of outbound data transfers should be declared, including: (i) outbound transfer of important data by a data processor; (ii) outbound transfer of personal information by a critical information infrastructure operator or a personal information processor who has processed the personal information of more than one million people; (iii) outbound transfer of personal information by a personal information processor who has made outbound transfers of the personal information of one million people cumulatively or the sensitive personal information of 10,000 people cumulatively since January 1 of the previous year; or (iv) other circumstances where an application for the security assessment of an outbound data transfer is required as prescribed by the national cyberspace administration authority. Based on the relevant regulations relating to outbound data transfer in the Cybersecurity Law, the Data Security Law, and the Personal Information Protection Law, the Measures provide the scope, conditions and procedures of security assessment of outbound data transfer and thereby provide specific guidelines for security assessment of outbound data transfers.

 

We believe that we are in compliance with the current data security, cybersecurity, and other regulations and policies issued by the CAC, and we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions from the CAC or other PRC governmental authorities for violation of those regulations or policies to date. However, since many of those regulations or policies are relatively new, there remains significant uncertainty as to their interpretation and implementation. If PRC governmental authorities interpret or implement those regulations or policies in a way different from us and conclude that there are violations by us in the future, or new laws, regulations, rules, or detailed implementation and interpretation are adopted that result in noncompliance by us, we may be subject to fines, penalties or other sanctions, which may have a significant adverse impact on our financial position, operations and the value of our Common stock. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any notice from any authorities identifying our PRC subsidiary as a critical information infrastructure operator or requiring us to go through cybersecurity review or network data security review by the CAC. We believe that our proposed listing in the U.S. will not be affected by the Cybersecurity Review Measures, Data Security Management Regulations Draft or the Measures, and our PRC operations will not be subject to cybersecurity review or network data security review by the CAC for this offering, because our business does not rely on the collection of user data or implicate cybersecurity and we do not possess more than one million users’ individual information. There remains uncertainty, however, as to how the Cybersecurity Review Measures, the Data Security Management Regulations Draft and the Measures will be interpreted or implemented and whether the PRC regulatory agencies, including the CAC, may adopt new laws, regulations, rules, or detailed implementation and interpretation related to the Cybersecurity Review Measures, the Data Security Management Regulations Draft and the Measures. If any such new laws, regulations, rules, or implementation and interpretation come into effect, we will take all reasonable measures and actions to comply and to minimize the adverse effect of such laws on us. We cannot guarantee, however, that we will not be subject to cybersecurity review or network data security review in the future.

 

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The approval of and the filing with the CSRC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our future offshore offerings under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval or complete such filing.

 

We believe that we are not currently required to obtain approval from Chinese authorities, including the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, or Cybersecurity Administration Committee, or CAC, to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges/quotation servicers or issue securities to foreign investors, however, if we were required to obtain approval in the future and were denied permission from Chinese authorities to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges and/or quotation servicers, we will not be able to continue to be quoted or listed on U.S. exchanges, which would materially affect the interests of the investors. It is uncertain when and whether the Company will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list or become quoted on U.S. exchanges in the future, and even when such permission is obtained, whether it will be denied or rescinded. Although the Company is currently not required to obtain permission from any of the PRC central or local government to obtain such permission and has not received any denial to list or become quoted on the U.S. exchange, our operations could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future laws and regulations relating to its business or industry; if we inadvertently conclude that such approvals are not required when they are, or applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations change and we are required to obtain approval in the future.

 

On December 24, 2021, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, issued Provisions of the State Council on the Administration of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (Draft for Comments) (the “Administration Provisions”), and the Administrative Measures for the Filing of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Measures”), which were open for public comments by January 23, 2022. The Administration Provisions and Measures for overseas listings lay out specific requirements for filing documents and include unified regulation management, strengthening regulatory coordination, and cross-border regulatory cooperation. Domestic companies seeking to list abroad must carry out relevant security screening procedures if their businesses involve supervisions such as foreign investment security and cyber security reviews. Companies endangering national security are among those off-limits for overseas listings. As the Administration Provisions and Measures have not yet come into effect, we are currently unaffected by them. However, it is uncertain when the Administration Provision and the Measures will take effect or if they will take effect as currently drafted.

 

On February 17, 2023, with the approval of the State Council, the CSRC released the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Trial Measures”) and five supporting guidelines, which will come into effect on March 31, 2023. According to the Trial Measures, among other requirements, (1) domestic companies that seek to offer or list securities overseas, both directly and indirectly, should fulfill the filing procedures with the CSRC; if a domestic company fails to complete the filing procedures, such domestic company may be subject to administrative penalties; and (2) where a domestic company seeks to indirectly offer and list securities in an overseas market, the issuer shall designate a major domestic operating entity responsible for all filing procedures with the CSRC, and such filings shall be submitted to the CSRC within three business days after the submission of the overseas offering and listing application. On the same day, the CSRC also held a press conference for the release of the Trial Measures and issued the Notice on Administration for the Filing of Overseas Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies, which clarifies that (1) on or prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, domestic companies that have already submitted valid applications for overseas offering and listing but have not obtained approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges may reasonably arrange the timing for submitting their filing applications with the CSRC, and must complete the filing before the completion of their overseas offering and listing; (2) a six-month transition period will be granted to domestic companies which, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, have already obtained the approval from overseas regulatory authorities or stock exchanges, but have not completed the indirect overseas listing; if domestic companies fail to complete the overseas listing within such six-month transition period, they shall file with the CSRC according to the requirements; and (3) the CSRC will solicit opinions from relevant regulatory authorities and complete the filing of the overseas listing of companies with contractual arrangements which duly meet the compliance requirements, and support the development and growth of these companies.

 

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With respect to the domestic company, non-compliance with the Trial Measures or an overseas listing completed in breach of it may result in a warning or a fine ranging from RMB 1 million to RMB10 million. Furthermore, the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company may be warned or fined between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million and the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company may be warned, or fined between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million. If, during the filing process, the domestic company conceals important factors or the content is materially false, and securities are not issued, they are subject to a fine of RMB1 million to RMB10 million. With respect to the directly responsible executives and other directly responsible personnel of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 500,000 and RMB 5 million, and with respect to the controlling shareholder, actual controllers, and other legally appointed persons of the domestic company, they are subject to a warning and fine between RMB 1 million and RMB 10 million.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, the Trial Measures have come into effect. After March 31, 2023, any failure or perceived failure by the domestic company or PRC subsidiaries to comply with the above confidentiality and archives administration requirements under the Trial Measures and other PRC laws and regulations may result in that the relevant entities would be held legally liable by competent authorities and referred to the judicial organization to be investigated for criminal liability if suspected of committing a crime.

 

According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies” Article 2 states, “Direct overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by joint-stock company incorporated domestically. Indirect overseas offering and listing by domestic companies refers to such overseas offering and listing by a company in the name of an overseas incorporated entity, whereas the company’s major business operations are located domestically, and such offering and listing is based on the underlying equity, assets, earnings or other similar rights of a domestic company”. Accordingly, as the Company believes it is not a joint-stock company incorporated domestically, this offering is not a direct overseas offering and listing by a domestic company. Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The company has taken no actions in regard to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so, and the company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now. If the Company is incorrect in its interpretation, the offering may be suspended or the Company may be delisted, causing your shares to become illiquid or worthless.

 

Article 15 states, “any overseas offering and listing made by an issuer that meets both the following conditions will be determined as indirect: (1) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year is accounted for by domestic companies; and (2) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in the Chinese Mainland, or its main places of business are located in the Chinese Mainland, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in the Chinese Mainland. The determination as to whether or not an overseas offering and listing by domestic companies is indirect, shall be made on a substance over form basis.” Article 34 states, “For the purpose of this Measures, domestic companies herein refer to companies incorporated within the Chinese Mainland, including domestic join-stock companies whose securities are directly offered and listed overseas and the domestic operating entities of companies whose securities are indirectly offered and listed overseas. Accordingly, the Company believes this offering is an indirect overseas offering by a domestic company.

 

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However, Article 16 states, “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. The Company is a Nevada Corporation formed on January 10, 1991. As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into an agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination. Therefore, this offering is classified as “Subsequent securities offerings of an issuer in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities”. The Company does not believe that it is required to seek pre-authorizations from Chinese authorities now, as the offering is not completed. The Company has taken no actions in regard to the CSRC approval and does not intend to do so prior to completion of this offering. The company does not believe that this offering is contingent upon receipt of approval from the CSRC now.

 

According to a translated copy of the current and effective regulations promulgated by the China Securities Regulatory Commission, that is, the “Regulations on Strengthening the Confidentiality and Archives Management Work Related to the Overseas Issuance and Listing of Securities” Article 3 states, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, documents and materials that contain state secrets or government work secrets, shall first obtain approval from competent authorities according to law, and file with the secrecy administrative department at the same level. Where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a state secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent secrecy administrative department for determination; where there is ambiguity or dispute over the identification of a government work secret, a request shall be submitted to the competent government authority for determination.” Further, Article 4 states that, “A domestic company that plans to, either directly or through its overseas listed entity, publicly disclose or provide to relevant entities or individuals including securities companies, securities service providers, and overseas regulators, other documents and materials that, if divulged, will jeopardize national security or public interest, shall strictly fulfill relevant procedures stipulated by applicable national regulations.” Accordingly, as the Company does not believe its operations fall into the above legal provisions, the Company does not believe that it is required to seek authorizations from Chinese authorities.

 

On December 28, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China (the “CAC”) jointly with the relevant authorities formally published Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) which took effect on February 15, 2022 and replace the former Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2020). Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021) stipulates that operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services, and online platform operator (together with the operators of critical information infrastructure, the “Operators”) carrying out data processing activities that affect or may affect national security, shall conduct a cybersecurity review, any online platform operator who controls more than one million users’ personal information must go through a cybersecurity review by the cybersecurity review office if it seeks to be listed in a foreign country. Given that: (i) we do not possess personal information on more than one million users in our business operations; and (ii) data processed in our business does not have a bearing on national security and thus may not be classified as core or important data by the authorities, this offering would not be required to apply for a cybersecurity review under the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (2021). As a result of the nature of the Company’s operations and size, the Company does not believe that the above is applicable to the Company. Additionally, The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business.

 

At present, we do not believe our operations require the approval and or permission of Chinese authorities. This is because the Company’s business is prefabricated food supply, which we believe does not require the approval and permission of the Chinese government. The “Special Management Measures for Foreign Investment Access (Negative List) (2021 Edition)” and “Market Access Negative List (2022 Edition)” issued by the Chinese government do not include the industry and business the Company is involved in. The Company is of the belief that the expenses of engaging PRC counsel would be unduly burdensome on the Company, and thus, the Company has not sought to engage PRC counsel to obtain an additional opinion pertaining to the Company’s understanding of all required approvals and permission to operate our business. If we are incorrect in our assessment, we may be forced to seek approval and such approval may be withheld. This could cause our operations to cease, which could have a material adverse effect on your investment.

 

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With the promulgation of the new filing-based administrative rules for overseas offering and listing by domestic companies in China, the PRC government may exert more oversight and control over overseas public offerings conducted by China-based issuers, which could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to of er or continue to of er our Common stock to investors and could cause the value of our Common stock to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

On August 8, 2006, six Chinese regulatory agencies, including the MOFCOM, jointly issued the M&A Rules, which became effective on September 8, 2006 and amended on June 22, 2009. The M&A Rules contain provisions that require that an offshore special purpose vehicle (“SPV”) formed for listing purposes and controlled directly or indirectly by Chinese companies or individuals shall obtain the approval of the CSRC prior to the listing and trading of such SPV’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. On September 21, 2006, the CSRC published procedures specifying documents and materials required to be submitted to it by an SPV seeking CSRC approval of overseas listings. We believe that, given that our WFOE is not a special purpose vehicle which has acquired PRC domestic companies’ equities with its shares prior to the listing of its shares, the CSRC approval is not required for the listing and trading of our Common stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market in the context of this offering. However, there remains uncertainty as to how the M&A Rules will be interpreted or implemented by the relevant PRC authorities, and the opinions summarized above will be subject to any new PRC laws, rules and regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations in any form relating to overseas listing of SPVs like the Company. We cannot assure you that relevant PRC government agencies, including the CSRC, would reach the same conclusion as we do.

 

Notwithstanding the foregoing, on February 17, 2023, the CSRC issued the Trial Administrative Measures and relevant supporting guidelines (collectively, the “New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings”), which came into force on March 31, 2023. According to the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, among other things, a domestic company in the PRC that seeks to offer and list securities in overseas markets shall fulfill the filing procedure with the CSRC as per requirement of the Trial Administrative Measures. Where a domestic company seeks to directly offer and list securities in overseas markets, the issuer shall file with the CSRC. Where a domestic company seeks to indirectly offer and list securities in overseas markets, the issuer shall designate a major domestic operating entity, which shall, as the domestic responsible entity, file with the CSRC. Initial public offerings or listings in overseas markets shall be filed with the CSRC within 3 working days after the relevant application is submitted overseas. If an issuer offers securities in the same overseas market where it has previously offered and listed securities subsequently, filings shall be made with the CSRC within 3 working days after the offering is completed. Upon occurrence of any material event, such as change of control, investigations or sanctions imposed by overseas securities regulatory agencies or other relevant competent authorities, change of listing status or transfer of listing segment, or voluntary or mandatory delisting, after an issuer has offered and listed securities in an overseas market, the issuer shall submit a report thereof to CSRC within 3 working days after the occurrence and public disclosure of such event. Further, an overseas securities company that serves as a sponsor or lead underwriter for overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies shall file with the CSRC within 10 working days after signing its first engagement agreement for such business, and submit to the CSRC, no later than January 31 each year, an annual report on its business activities in the previous year associated with overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies. If an overseas securities company has entered into engagement agreements before the effectuation of the Trial Administrative Measures and is serving in practice as a sponsor or lead underwriter for overseas securities offering and listing by domestic companies, it shall file with the CSRC within 30 working days after the Trial Administrative Measures take effect.

 

Under the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, a domestic company is prohibited from overseas offering and listing if any of the following circumstances is involved: (1) where such securities offering and listing is explicitly prohibited by provisions in laws, administrative regulations and relevant state rules; (2) where the intended securities offering and listing may endanger national security as reviewed and determined by competent authorities under the State Council in accordance with law; (3) where the domestic company intending to make the securities offering and listing, or its controlling shareholders and the actual controller, have committed crimes such as corruption, bribery, embezzlement, misappropriation of property or undermining the order of the socialist market economy during the latest three years; (4) where the domestic company intending to make the securities offering and listing is suspected of committing crimes or major violations of laws and regulations, and is under investigation according to law, and no conclusion has yet been made thereof; and (5) where there are material ownership disputes over equity held by the domestic company’s controlling shareholder or by other shareholders that are controlled by the controlling shareholder and/or actual controller. Moreover, a domestic company that seeks to offer and list securities in overseas markets shall abide by certain other regulatory requirements as set out in the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, including without limitation to, compliance with national secrecy, foreign investment, cybersecurity, data security, cross-border investment and financing, foreign exchange, and other laws and relevant provisions. If we are required to file with the CSRC in accordance with the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, there is also the possibility that we may not be able to complete the filing in a timely manner or at all. Further, if any PRC regulatory approval was required while we inadvertently concluded that such approval was not required or if applicable laws and regulations or the interpretation of such were modified to require us to obtain the regulatory approval in the future, we may face regulatory actions or other sanctions from the relevant Chinese regulatory authorities. These authorities may impose fines and penalties upon our operations in China, limit our operating privileges in China, delay or restrict the repatriation of the proceeds from this offering into China, or take other actions that could have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and prospects, as well as the trading price of our Common stock. The Chinese regulatory agencies may also take actions requiring us, or making it advisable for us, to terminate this offering prior to closing. Any failure of us to fully comply with new regulatory requirements may significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer the Common stock, cause significant disruption to our business operations, severely damage our reputation, materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations, and cause the Common stock to significantly decline in value or become worthless.

 

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Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies, which could occur quickly with little advance notice, could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

Substantially all of our assets and operations are located in the PRC. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in the PRC generally. The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the level of government involvement, development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange, monetary and tax policies, allocation of resources, and regulation of the growth of the general or specific market and a host of other government policies such as those that encourage or restrict investment in certain industries by foreign investors. Although the PRC government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets, and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in the PRC is still owned by the government. In addition, the PRC government continues to play a significant role in regulating industry development by imposing industrial policies. The PRC government also exercises significant control over the PRC’s economic growth through allocating resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies.

 

While the Chinese economy has experienced significant growth over past decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. Any adverse changes in economic conditions in the PRC, in the policies of the PRC government or in the laws and regulations in the PRC, which may occur quickly with little advance notice, could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of the PRC. Such developments could adversely affect our business and operating results, lead to a reduction in demand for our services and adversely affect our competitive position. The PRC government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures may benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations. In addition, in the past the PRC government has implemented certain measures, including interest rate adjustment, to control the pace of economic growth. These measures may cause decreased economic activity in the PRC, which may adversely affect our business and operating results. In addition, although these government involvements have been instrumental in China’s significant growth, if the PRC government’s current or future policies fail to help the Chinese economy achieve further growth, our growth rate or strategy, our results of operations could also be adversely affected as a result.

 

Our profitability may be seriously affected by fluctuations in exchange rates between the Renminbi and the U.S. dollar.

 

All of our revenue is denominated in Renminbi while our financial reporting is in U.S. dollars. As a result, any significant fluctuation in exchange rates may cause us to incur currency exchange translation and harm our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Movements in Renminbi exchange rates are affected by, among other things, changes in political and economic conditions and China’s foreign exchange regime and policy. The Renminbi has been unpegged from the U.S. dollar since July 2005 and, although the People’s Bank of China regularly intervenes in the foreign exchange market to limit fluctuations in Renminbi exchange rates, the Renminbi may appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the medium to long term. Moreover, it is possible that the PRC authorities may lift restrictions on fluctuations in Renminbi exchange rates and lessen intervention in the foreign exchange market in the future.

 

To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure or at all.

 

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Governmental control of currency conversion may limit our ability to use our revenues effectively and the ability of our WFOE to obtain financing.

 

The PRC government imposes control on the convertibility of the Renminbi into foreign currencies and, in certain cases, the remittance of currency out of China. We receive all our revenues in Renminbi, which currently is not a freely convertible currency. Restrictions on currency conversion imposed by the PRC government may limit our ability to use revenues generated in Renminbi to fund our expenditures denominated in foreign currencies or our business activities outside China. Under China’s existing foreign exchange regulations, Renminbi may be freely converted into foreign currency for payments relating to current account transactions, which include among other things dividend payments and payments for the import of goods and services, by complying with certain procedural requirements. Our WFOE is able to pay dividends in foreign currencies to us without prior approval from SAFE, by complying with certain procedural requirements Our WFOE may also retain foreign currency in its current account bank accounts for use in payment of international current account transactions. However, we cannot assure you that the PRC government will not take measures in the future to restrict access to foreign currencies for current account transactions.

 

Conversion of Renminbi into foreign currencies, and of foreign currencies into Renminbi, for payments relating to capital account transactions, which principally includes investments and loans, generally requires the approval of SAFE and other relevant PRC governmental authorities. Restrictions on the convertibility of the Renminbi for capital account transactions could affect the ability of WFOE to make investments overseas or to obtain foreign currency through debt or equity financing, including by means of loans or capital contributions from us. We cannot assure you that the registration process will not delay or prevent our conversion of Renminbi for use outside of China.

 

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing actions in China against us or our management named in the prospectus.

 

We conduct substantially all of our operations in China, and substantially all of our assets are located in China, which is an emerging market. In addition, all of our directors and officers are nationals or residents of countries other than the United States, and a substantial portion of the assets of these persons is located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for our shareholders to effect service of process upon us or those persons inside the PRC.

 

It may also be difficult for you to enforce the U.S. courts judgments obtained in U.S. courts, including judgments based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against us and our officers and directors, many of whom are not residents in the United States, and whose significant part of assets are located outside of the United States. In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the Cayman Islands or the PRC, respectively, would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state. In addition, it is uncertain whether such Cayman Islands or PRC courts would entertain original actions brought in the courts of the Cayman Islands or the PRC against us or such persons predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any state.

 

Specifically, regarding judgment enforcement in the PRC, the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under the PRC Civil Procedures Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on principles of reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties or other forms of reciprocal arrangement with the United States that provide for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. In addition, according to the PRC Civil Procedures Law, the PRC courts will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates the basic principles of PRC laws or national sovereignty, security or public interest of the PRC. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the U.S.

 

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We face uncertainty regarding the PRC tax reporting obligations and consequences for certain indirect transfers of the stock of our operating company.

 

Under the current PRC tax regulations, indirect transfers of equity interests and other properties of PRC tax resident enterprises by non-PRC holding companies may be subject to PRC tax. In accordance with the Announcement of the State Administration of Taxation on Several Issues concerning the Enterprise Income Tax on the Indirect Transfers of Properties by Non-Resident Enterprises (“Announcement 7”) issued by the SAT on February 3, 2015, if a non-PRC tax resident enterprise indirectly transfers equities and other properties of a PRC tax resident enterprise and such indirect transfer will produce a result identical or substantially similar to direct transfer of equity interests and other properties of the PRC tax resident enterprise, the non-PRC tax resident enterprise may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate up to 10%. The Announcement of the State Administration of Taxation on Matters Concerning Withholding of Income Tax of Non-resident Enterprises at Source (“Announcement 37”), which was issued by SAT on October 17, 2017 and became effective on December 1, 2017, renovates the principles and procedures concerning the indirect equity transfer tax withholding for a non-PRC tax resident enterprise. Failure to comply with the tax payment obligations by a non-PRC tax resident will result in penalties, including full payment of tax owed, fines and default interest on those tax.

 

According to Announcement 7, where a non-resident enterprise indirectly transfers equity interests or other properties of PRC tax resident enterprises (“PRC Taxable Property”) to avoid its tax liabilities by implementing arrangements without reasonable commercial purpose, such indirect transfer shall be recharacterized and recognized as a direct transfer of PRC Taxable Property. As a result, gains derived from such indirect transfer and attributable to PRC Taxable Property may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10%. In respect of an indirect offshore transfer of property of a PRC establishment or place of business of a foreign enterprise, the resulting gain is to be included with the annual enterprise filing of the PRC establishment or place of business being transferred and would consequently be subject to PRC enterprise income tax at a rate of 25%. Announcement 7 further sets forth certain “safe harbors” which would be deemed to have a reasonable commercial purpose. As a general principle, the SAT also issued the Administration of General Anti-Tax Avoidance (Trial Implementation) (“GATA”), which became effective on February 1, 2015 and empowers the PRC tax authorities to apply special tax adjustments for “tax avoidance arrangements.”

 

We face uncertainties as to the reporting and other implications of certain past and future transactions where PRC Taxable Property are involved, such as offshore restructuring, sale of the shares in our offshore subsidiary and investments. Our Company may be subject to withholding obligations if our Company is considered as a transferee in such transactions, under Announcement 7 and Announcement 37. For transfer of shares in our Company by investors who are non-PRC resident enterprises, our PRC subsidiary may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with Announcement 7 and Announcement 37 or to request the relevant transferors from whom we purchase taxable assets to comply with these circulars, or to establish that our company should not be taxed under these circulars, which may have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

PRC regulations relating to the establishment of offshore special purpose companies by PRC residents may subject our PRC resident shareholders to personal liability and limit our ability to acquire PRC companies or to inject capital into WFOE, limit WFOE’s ability to distribute profits to us, or otherwise materially and adversely affect us.

 

Under the Circular of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Issues concerning Foreign Exchange Administration over the Overseas Investment and Financing and Round-trip Investment by Domestic Residents via Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 37, issued by SAFE, prior registration with the local SAFE branch is required for PRC residents to contribute domestic assets or interests to offshore companies, known as SPVs. Moreover, Circular 37 applies retroactively. As a result, PRC residents who have contributed domestic assets or interest to a SPV but failed to complete foreign exchange registration of overseas investments as required before July 4, 2014, shall send a letter to SAFE and its branches for explanation. SAFE and its branches shall, under the principle of legality and legitimacy, conduct supplementary registration, and impose administrative punishment on those in violation of the administrative provisions on the foreign exchange pursuant to the law.

 

We have requested our shareholders who are PRC residents to make the necessary applications, filings and amendments as required under Circular 37 and other related rules. We attempt to comply, and attempt to ensure that our shareholders who are subject to these rules comply with the relevant requirements. However, we cannot provide any assurances that all of our shareholders who are PRC residents will comply with our request to make or obtain any application registrations or comply with other requirements required by Circular 37 or other related rules. The failure or inability of our PRC resident shareholders to make any required registrations or comply with other requirements may subject such shareholders to fines and legal sanctions and may also limit our ability to contribute additional capital into or provide loans to (including using the proceeds from this offering) YDTC, limiting the ability of YDTC to pay dividends or otherwise distribute profits to us.

 

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Failure to comply with the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules relating to the overseas direct investment or our PRC resident shareholders’ engaging in the issuance or trading of securities overseas may subject them to fines or other liabilities.

 

Other than Circular 37, our ability to conduct foreign exchange activities in China may be subject to interpretation and enforcement of the Implementation Rules of the Administrative Measures for Individual Foreign Exchange promulgated by SAFE in January 2007 (as amended and supplemented, the “Individual Foreign Exchange Rules”). Under the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules, any PRC individual seeking to make a direct investment overseas or engage in the issuance or trading of negotiable securities or derivatives overseas must make the appropriate registrations in accordance with SAFE provisions. PRC individuals who fail to make such registrations may be subject to warnings, fines or other liabilities.

 

We may not be fully informed of the identities of all our beneficial owners who are PRC residents. For example, because the investment in or trading of our shares will happen in an overseas public or secondary market where shares are often held with brokers in brokerage accounts, it is unlikely that we will know the identity of all of our beneficial owners who are PRC residents. Furthermore, we have no control over any of our future beneficial owners and we cannot assure you that such PRC residents will be able to complete the necessary approval and registration procedures required by the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules.

 

It is uncertain how the Individual Foreign Exchange Rules will be interpreted or enforced and whether such interpretation or enforcement will affect our ability to conduct foreign exchange transactions. Because of this uncertainty, we cannot be sure whether the failure by any of our PRC resident shareholders to make the required registration will subject our subsidiaries to fines or legal sanctions on their operations, delay or restriction on repatriation of proceeds of this offering into the China, restriction on remittance of dividends or other punitive action that would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

PRC regulation of loans and direct investment by offshore holding companies to or in PRC entities may delay or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to WFOE, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

In using the proceeds from this public offering or any future offerings, we may make loans to the WFOE. Any loans to either are subject to PRC regulations and approvals. For example, loans by us to our WFOE in China cannot exceed statutory limits and must be registered with SAFE or its local counterpart. We may also decide to finance our WFOE through capital contributions. These capital contributions must be approved by the Ministry of Commerce in China or its local counterpart. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain these government registrations or approvals on a timely basis, if at all. If we fail to receive such registrations or approvals, our ability to use the proceeds of this offering and to capitalize our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could adversely and materially affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

The SAFE’s Circular on Reforming the Administration Approach Regarding the Foreign Exchange Capital Settlement of Foreign-invested Enterprises (“Circular 19”) provides that the conversion from foreign currency registered capital of foreign-invested enterprises into the Renminbi capital may be at foreign-invested enterprises’ discretion, which means that the foreign currency registered capital of foreign-invested enterprises for which the rights and interests of monetary contribution has been confirmed by the local foreign exchange bureau (or the book-entry of monetary contribution has been registered) can be settled at the banks based on the actual operational needs of the enterprises.

 

Further, according to Circular 19, the flow and use of the RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested company is regulated such that RMB capital may not be used for the issuance of RMB entrusted loans, the repayment of inter-enterprise loans or the repayment of banks loans that have been transferred to a third party. Although Circular 19 allows RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested enterprise to be used for equity investments within China, it also reiterates the principle that RMB converted from the foreign currency-denominated capital of a foreign-invested company may not be directly or indirectly used for purposes beyond its business scope. Thus, it is unclear whether SAFE will permit such capital to be used for equity investments in China in actual practice.

 

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In July 2016, the SAFE promulgated the Circular on Reforming and Standardizing the Administrative Provisions on Capital Account Foreign Exchange (“Circular 16”), which applies to all domestic enterprises in China. Circular 16 reiterates some of the rules set forth in Circular 19 but changes the prohibition against using RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested company to issue RMB entrusted loans to a prohibition against using such capital to issue loans to non-associated enterprises.

 

Circular 19 and Circular 16 may significantly limit the ability of our WFOE to transfer and use Renminbi funds from its foreign currency denominated capital, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In light of the various requirements imposed by PRC regulations on loans to and direct investment in PRC entities by offshore holding companies, we cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the necessary government registrations or obtain the necessary government approvals on a timely basis, if at all, with respect to future loans by us to our PRC subsidiary or with respect to future capital contributions by us to our PRC subsidiary. If we fail to complete such registrations or obtain such approvals, our ability to use the proceeds we received from our initial public offering and to capitalize or otherwise fund our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

We must remit the offering proceeds to our WFOE in China before they may be used to benefit our business in China. This process may take a number of months and we will be unable to use the proceeds to grow our business in the meantime.

 

The proceeds of this offering must be sent back to China, and the process for sending such proceeds back to our WFOE in China may take several months after the closing of this offering. In order to remit the offering proceeds to China, we will take the following actions:

 

First, we will open a special foreign exchange account for capital account transactions. To open this account, we must submit to SAFE certain application forms, identity documents, transaction documents, form of foreign exchange registration of overseas investments by domestic residents, and foreign exchange registration certificate of the invested company.

 

Second, we will remit the offering proceeds into this special foreign exchange account.

 

Third, we will apply for settlement of the foreign exchange. In order to do so, we must submit to SAFE certain application forms, identity documents, payment order to a designated person, and a tax certificate.

 

The timing of the process is difficult to estimate because the efficiencies of different SAFE branches can vary materially. Ordinarily, the process takes several months to complete. We may be unable to use these proceeds to grow our business until we receive such proceeds in China.

 

To the extent any funds or assets in the business is in mainland China or a mainland China entity, the funds or assets may not be available to fund operations or for other use outside of mainland China.

 

To the extent funds are generated in our PRC operating subsidiary, and may need to be used to fund operations outside of mainland China, such funds may not be available due to limitations placed by the PRC government. Furthermore, to the extent assets (other than cash) in our business are located in mainland China or held by a mainland China entity, the assets may not be available to fund operations or for other use outside of mainland China due to interventions in or the imposition of restrictions and limitations on the ability of us and our subsidiaries to transfer assets by the PRC government.

 

35

 

We must remit the offering proceeds to our PRC operating subsidiary before they may be used to benefit our business in China, the process of which may be time-consuming, and we cannot assure that we can finish all necessary governmental registration processes in a timely manner.

 

The proceeds of this offering may be sent back to the PRC, and the process for sending such proceeds back to the PRC may be time-consuming after the closing of this offering. We may be unable to use these proceeds to grow our business until our PRC subsidiary receives such proceeds in the PRC. Any transfer of funds by us to our PRC subsidiary, either as a shareholder loan or as an increase in registered capital, are subject to approval by or registration or filing with relevant governmental authorities in China. Any foreign loans procured by our PRC subsidiary is required to be registered with China’s State Administration of Foreign Exchange (“SAFE”) in its local branches and satisfy relevant requirements, and our PRC subsidiary may not procure loans which exceed the difference between its respective total project investment amount and registered capital or two times (which may be varied year by year due to the change of PRC’s national macro-control policy) of the net worth of our PRC subsidiary. According to the relevant PRC regulations on foreigninvested enterprises in China, capital contributions to our PRC subsidiary are subject to the registration with State Administration for Market Regulation in its local branches, report submission to the Ministry of Commerce in its local branches and registration with a local bank authorized by SAFE.

 

To remit the proceeds of the offering, we must take the steps legally required under the PRC laws, for example, we will open a special foreign exchange account for capital account transactions, remit the offering proceeds into such special foreign exchange account and apply for settlement of the foreign exchange. The timing of the process is difficult to estimate because the efficiencies of different SAFE branches can vary materially. 49 In light of the various requirements imposed by PRC regulations on loans to, and direct investment in, PRC entities by offshore holding companies, we cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the necessary government registrations or obtain the necessary government approvals on a timely basis, if at all, with respect to future loans by us to our PRC subsidiary or with respect to future capital contributions by us to our PRC subsidiary. If we fail to complete such registrations or obtain such approvals, our ability to use the proceeds from this offering and to capitalize or otherwise fund our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity, our ability to fund and expand our business and the value of our Common stock.

 

We may be classified as a “resident enterprise” for PRC enterprise income tax purposes; such classification could result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders.

 

The PRC enterprise income tax law and its implementing rules provide that enterprises established outside of China whose “de facto management bodies” are located in China are considered “resident enterprises” under PRC tax laws. The implementing rules define the term “de facto management bodies” as a management body which substantially manages, or has control over the business, personnel, finance and assets of an enterprise. Circular 82, issued by the State Administration of Taxation, provides that a foreign enterprise controlled by a PRC company or a group of PRC companies will be classified as a “resident enterprise” with its “de facto management body” located within China if all of the following requirements are satisfied: (1) the senior management and core management departments in charge of its daily operations function are mainly in China; (2) its financial and human resources decisions are subject to determination or approval by persons or bodies in China; (3) its major assets, accounting books, company seals, and minutes and files of its board and shareholders’ meetings are located or kept in China; and (4) at least half of the enterprise’s directors with voting right or senior management reside in China. To provide more guidance on the implementation of Circular 82, the State Administration of Taxation issued Bulletin 45, which clarifies certain matters relating to resident status determination, post-determination administration and competent tax authorities.

 

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The State Administration of Taxation since issued a bulletin to provide more guidance on the implementation of Circular 82. This bulletin further provides that, among other things, an entity that is classified as a “resident enterprise” in accordance with the circular shall file the application for classifying its status of residential enterprise with the local tax authorities where its main domestic investors are registered. From the year in which the entity is determined to be a “resident enterprise,” any dividend, profit and other equity investment gain shall be taxed in accordance with the enterprise income tax law and its implementing rules.

 

Currently, there are no detailed rules or precedents governing the procedures and specific criteria for determining de facto management bodies which are applicable to our company or our overseas subsidiary. If our company or any of our overseas subsidiaries is considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for PRC enterprise income tax purposes, a number of unfavorable PRC tax consequences could follow. First, our company or our overseas subsidiary will be subject to the uniform 25% enterprise income tax rate as to our global income as well as PRC enterprise income tax reporting obligations. Second, although under the Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementing rules dividends paid to us from our PRC subsidiary would qualify as tax-exempted income, we cannot assure you that such dividends will not be subject to a 10% withholding tax, as the PRC foreign exchange control authorities, which enforce the withholding tax, have not yet issued guidance with respect to the processing of outbound remittances to entities that are treated as resident enterprises for PRC enterprise income tax purposes. Finally, dividends payable by us to our shareholders and gain on the sale of our shares may become subject to PRC withholding tax. It is possible that future guidance issued with respect to the new resident enterprise classification could result in a situation in which a withholding tax of 10% for our non-PRC enterprise shareholders or a potential withholding tax of 20% for individual investors is imposed on dividends we pay to them and with respect to gains derived by such investors from transferring our shares. In addition to the uncertainty in how the new resident enterprise classification could apply, it is also possible that the rules may change in the future, possibly with retroactive effect. If we are required under the Enterprise Income Tax law to withhold PRC income tax on our dividends payable to our foreign shareholders, or if we are required to pay PRC income tax on the transfer of our shares under the circumstances mentioned above, the value of your investment in our shares may be materially and adversely affected. It is unclear whether, if we are considered a PRC resident enterprise, holders of our shares would be able to claim the benefit of income tax treaties or agreements entered into between China and other countries or areas.

 

Our current employment practices may be restricted under the PRC Labor Contract Law and our labor costs may increase as a result.

 

The PRC Labor Contract Law and its implementing rules impose requirements concerning contracts entered into between an employer and its employees and establishes time limits for probationary periods and for how long an employee can be placed in a fixed-term labor contract. Because the Labor Contract Law and its implementing rules have not been in effect very long and because there is lack of clarity with respect to their implementation and potential penalties and fines, it is uncertain how it will impact our current employment policies and practices. We cannot assure you that our employment policies and practices do not, or will not, violate the Labor Contract Law or its implementing rules and that we will not be subject to related penalties, fines or legal fees. If we are subject to large penalties or fees related to the Labor Contract Law or its implementing rules, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. In addition, according to the Labor Contract Law and its implementing rules, if we intend to enforce the non-compete provision with an employee in a labor contract or non-competition agreement, we have to compensate the employee on a monthly basis during the term of the restriction period after the termination or ending of the labor contract, which may cause extra expenses to us. Moreover, the Labor Contract Law and its implementation rules require certain terminations to be based upon seniority rather than merit, which significantly affects the cost of reducing workforce for employers. In the event we decide to significantly change or decrease our workforce in the PRC, the Labor Contract Law could adversely affect our ability to enact such changes in a manner that is most advantageous to our circumstances or in a timely and cost effective manner, thus our results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Furthermore, the economy in China has experienced increases in inflation and labor costs in recent years. As a result, average wages in the PRC are expected to continue to increase. In addition, we are required by PRC laws and regulations to pay various statutory employee benefits, including pension, housing fund, medical insurance, on-the-job injury insurance, unemployment insurance and maternity insurance to designated government agencies for the benefit of our employees. We expect that our labor costs, including wages and employee benefits, will continue to increase. Unless we are able to control our labor costs or pass on these increased labor costs to our users by increasing the fees of our services, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

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The United States Senate has passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which, through the enactment of the CAA, decreased the number of “non-inspection years” from three years to two years, and thus, reduced the time before your securities may be prohibited from trading or delisted.

 

With the enactment of the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, as amended by the CAA, our common shares may be prohibited from trading or even delisted in two years from the completion of the offering. Furthermore, the Commission adopted rules to implement the HFCAA and, pursuant to the HFCAA, the PCAOB has issued its report notifying the Commission of its determination that it is unable to inspect or investigate completely accounting firms headquartered in mainland China or Hong Kong. Therefore, our common shares are at advanced risk of prohibition from trading or delisting in two years from the offering. If the PRC adopts positions at any time in the future that would prevent the PCAOB from continuing to inspect or investigate completely our auditor, we could then be delisted within two years.

 

We face uncertainties with respect to our business operations and direct and indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprises by their non-PRC holding companies.

 

We face uncertainties with respect to our business operations and direct and indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprises by their non-PRC holding companies. PRC Governmental Agencies may intervene or influence the Company’s operations at any time, which could result in a material change in the Company’s operations and/or the value of the Common shares. Given recent statements by the Chinese government indicating an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, any such action could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

Adverse changes in economic and political policies of the PRC government could have a material and adverse effect on overall economic growth in China, which could materially and adversely affect our business. General macroeconomic conditions may materially and adversely affect our business, prospects, results of operations and financial position. The PRC government’s control over foreign currency conversion may adversely affect our business and results of operations and our ability to remit dividends. PRC regulation of loans to and direct investments in PRC entities by offshore holding companies may delay or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our operating subsidiary in China, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand business.

 

The M&A Rules and certain other PRC regulations may make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions. Under the Enterprise Income Tax Law, we may be classified as a “Resident Enterprise” of China. Such classification will likely result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment. The M&A Rules, among other things, purport to require CSRC approval prior to the listing and trading on an overseas stock exchange of the securities of an offshore special purpose vehicle established or controlled directly or indirectly by Material PRC Companies or individuals and formed for the purpose of overseas listing through the acquisition of PRC domestic interests held by such Material PRC Companies or individuals.

 

We believe that a prior approval from the CSRC may be required for the Offering, but we are seeking an exemption or approval. If we are required to file with the CSRC in accordance with the New Administrative Rules Regarding Overseas Listings, there is also the possibility that we may not be able to complete the filing in a timely manner or at all. There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of the M&A Rules, other PRC Laws and future PRC laws and regulations, and there can be no assurance that any Governmental Agency will not take a view that is contrary to or otherwise different from our opinions stated herein.

 

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The audit report included in this Amendment is prepared by an auditor who may not have been not inspected by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and as such, our investors are deprived of the benefits of such inspection. The Company could be delisted if it is unable to timely meet the PCAOB inspection requirements established by the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, as amended by the CAA.

 

As a public company with securities quoted on the OTC Pink Sheets, we will be required to have our financial statements audited by an independent registered public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB. A requirement of being registered with the PCAOB is that if requested by the SEC or PCAOB, such accounting firm is required to make its audits and related audit work papers be subject to regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Since our auditor is located in PRC, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities due to various state secrecy laws and the revised Securities Law, the PCAOB currently has limited access to inspect the work of our auditor. The lack of access to the PCAOB inspection in PRC prevents the PCAOB from fully evaluating audits and quality control procedures of the auditors based in PRC. As a result, the investors may be deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. Despite an agreement between the U.S. and the PRC in October of 2022, the limited ability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in PRC makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of these accounting firms’ audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of PRC that are subject to the PCAOB inspections.

 

On December 18, 2020, the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, or HFCAA, was enacted, and was amended by the CAA. In essence, the act requires the SEC to prohibit securities of any foreign companies from being listed on U.S. securities exchanges or traded “over-the-counter” if a company retains a foreign accounting firm that cannot be inspected by the PCAOB for two consecutive years, beginning in 2021. Our independent registered public accounting firm is located in and organized under the laws of PRC, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, and therefore our auditors are not currently inspected by the PCAOB.

 

On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final amendments, which will become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCAA. The interim final amendments will apply to registrants that the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that the PCAOB has determined it is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in that jurisdiction. Before any registrant will be required to comply with the interim final amendments, the SEC must implement a process for identifying such registrants. As of the date of this Amendment, the SEC is seeking public comment on this identification process. Consistent with the HFCAA, the amendments will require any identified registrant to submit documentation to the SEC establishing that the registrant is not owned or controlled by a government entity in that jurisdiction, and will also require, among other things, disclosure in the registrant’s annual report regarding the audit arrangements of, and government influence on, such registrant.

 

On July 19, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act which, decreased the number of non-inspection years from three years to two, thus reducing the time period before our securities may be delisted or prohibited from trading.

 

On November 5, 2021, the SEC approved PCAOB Rule 6100, Board Determination Under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountability Act, effective immediately. The rule establishes “a framework for the PCAOB’s determinations under the HFCAA that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by an authority in that jurisdiction.”

 

On December 2, 2021, SEC has announced the adoption of amendments to finalize rules implementing the submission and disclosure requirements in the HFCAA. The rules apply to registrants the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate (Commission-Identified Issuers). The final amendments require Commission-Identified Issuers to submit documentation to the SEC establishing that, if true, it is not owned or controlled by a governmental entity in the public accounting firm’s foreign jurisdiction. The amendments also require that a Commission-Identified Issuer that is a “foreign issuer,” as defined in Exchange Act Rule 3b-4, provide certain additional disclosures in its annual report for itself and any of its consolidated foreign operating entities. Further, the adopting release provides notice regarding the procedures the SEC has established to identify issuers and to impose trading prohibitions on the securities of certain Commission- Identified Issuers, as required by the HFCAA. The SEC will identify Commission-Identified Issuers for fiscal years beginning after December 18, 2020. A Commission-Identified Issuer will be required to comply with the submission and disclosure requirements in the annual report for each year in which it was identified. If a registrant is identified as a Commission-Identified Issuer based on its annual report for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, the registrant will be required to comply with the submission or disclosure requirements in its annual report filing covering the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022.

 

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On December 16, 2021, PCAOB issued a report on its determinations that PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely PCAOB-registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and in Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), because of positions taken by PRC authorities in those jurisdictions. The PCAOB made these determinations pursuant to PCAOB Rule 6100, which provides a framework for how the PCAOB fulfils its responsibilities under the HFCAA. The report further listed in its Appendix A and Appendix B, Registered Public Accounting Firms Subject to the Mainland China Determination and Registered Public Accounting Firms Subject to the Hong Kong Determination, respectively. The audit report included in this registration statement for the year ended December 31, 2022, was issued by HAOXIN, an audit firm headquartered in PRC, a jurisdiction that the PCAOB has determined the PCAOB may be unable to conduct inspections or investigate auditors, despite a recent treaty allowing the PCAOB to review the audit papers of firms in the PRC. Our auditors HAOXIN is among those listed by the PCAOB Mainland China Determination, a determination announced by the PCAOB on December 16, 2021 that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in PRC, because of a position taken by one or more authorities in PRC. As a result, we and investors in our common stock may be deprived of the benefits of such full PCAOB inspections. As a result, the investors may be deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in PRC makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of these accounting firms’ audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of PRC that are subject to the PCAOB inspections. In addition, under the HFCAA, as amended by the CAA, our securities may be prohibited from trading on the U.S. stock exchanges or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S. if our auditor is not inspected by the PCAOB for two consecutive years, and this ultimately could result in our common stock being delisted. Furthermore, on July 19, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“AHFCAA”), which, if enacted, would amend the HFCAA and require the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges or in the over the counter trading market in the U.S. if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years. In the future, if we do not engage an auditor that is subject to regular inspection by the PCAOB, our common stocks may be delisted.

 

The SEC may propose additional rules or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended that the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfil its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCAA. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCAA. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022.

 

The enactment of the HFCAA and the implications of any additional rulemaking efforts to increase U.S. regulatory access to audit information in China could cause investor uncertainty for affected SEC registrants, including us, and the market price of our stock could be materially adversely affected. Additionally, whether the PCAOB will be able to conduct inspections of our auditors in the next two years, or at all, is subject to substantial uncertainty and depends on a number of factors out of our control. If we are unable to meet the PCAOB inspection requirement in time, our stock will not be permitted for trading “over-the counter” either. Such a delisting would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our stock when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with delisting would have a negative impact on the price of our stock. Also, such a delisting would significantly affect our ability to raise capital on terms acceptable to us, or at all, which would have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and prospects.

 

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Risks Related to our Common Stock

 

The OTC Pink and share value

 

Our Common Stock trades over the counter, which may deprive stockholders of the full value of their shares. Our stock is quoted via the Over-The-Counter (“OTC”) Pink Sheets under the ticker symbol “ALTB”. Therefore, our Common Stock is expected to have fewer market makers, lower trading volumes, and larger spreads between bid and asked prices than securities listed on an exchange such as the New York Stock Exchange or the NASDAQ Stock Market. These factors may result in higher price volatility and less market liquidity for our Common Stock.

 

Low market price

 

A low market price would severely limit the potential market for our Common Stock. Our Common Stock is expected to trade at a price substantially below $5.00 per share, subjecting trading in the stock to certain Commission rules requiring additional disclosures by broker-dealers. These rules generally apply to any non-NASDAQ equity security that has a market price share of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions (a “penny stock”). Such rules require the delivery, prior to any penny stock transaction, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock market and the risks associated therewith and impose various sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell penny stocks to persons other than established customers and institutional or wealthy investors. For these types of transactions, the broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to the sale. The broker-dealer also must disclose the commissions payable to the broker-dealer, current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock and, if the broker-dealer is the sole market maker, the broker-dealer must disclose this fact and the broker-dealer’s presumed control over the market. Such information must be provided to the customer orally or in writing before or with the written confirmation of trade sent to the customer. Monthly statements must be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks. The additional burdens imposed upon broker-dealers by such requirements could discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our Common Stock.

 

Lack of market and state blue sky laws

 

Investors may have difficulty in reselling their shares due to the lack of market or state Blue Sky laws. The holders of our shares of Common Stock and persons who desire to purchase them in any trading market that might develop in the future should be aware that there may be significant state law restrictions upon the ability of investors to resell our shares. Accordingly, investors should consider any secondary market for our securities to be a limited one. We intend to seek coverage and publication of information regarding our Company in an accepted publication which permits a “manual exemption.” This manual exemption permits a security to be distributed in a particular state without being registered if the company issuing the security has a listing for that security in a securities manual recognized by the state. However, it is not enough for the security to be listed in a recognized manual. The listing entry must contain (1) the names of issuers, officers, and directors, (2) an issuer’s balance sheet, and (3) a profit and loss statement for either the fiscal year preceding the balance sheet or for the most recent fiscal year of operations. We may not be able to secure a listing containing all of this information. Furthermore, the manual exemption is a non-issuer exemption restricted to secondary trading transactions, making it unavailable for issuers selling newly issued securities. Most of the accepted manuals are those published in Standard and Poor’s, Moody’s Investor Service, Fitch’s Investment Service, and Best’s Insurance Reports, and many states expressly recognize these manuals. A smaller number of states declare that they “recognize securities manuals” but do not specify the recognized manuals. The following states do not have any provisions and therefore do not expressly recognize the manual exemption: Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Montana, South Dakota, Tennessee, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

 

Accordingly, our shares of Common Stock should be considered totally illiquid, which inhibits investors’ ability to resell their shares.

 

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Penny stock regulations

 

We will be subject to penny stock regulations and restrictions and you may have difficulty selling shares of our Common Stock. The Commission has adopted regulations which generally define so-called “penny stocks” to be an equity security that has a market price less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exemptions. We anticipate that our Common Stock will become a “penny stock”, and we will become subject to Rule 15g-9 under the Exchange Act, or the “Penny Stock Rule”. This rule imposes additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers that sell such securities to persons other than established customers. For transactions covered by Rule 15g-9, a broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to sale. As a result, this rule may affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our securities and may affect the ability of purchasers to sell any of our securities in the secondary market.

 

For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require delivery, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, of a disclosure schedule prepared by the Commission relating to the penny stock market. Disclosure is also required to be made about sales commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, monthly statements are required to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stock.

 

We do not anticipate that our Common Stock will qualify for exemption from the Penny Stock Rule. In any event, even if our Common Stock were exempt from the Penny Stock Rule, we would remain subject to Section 15(b)(6) of the Exchange Act, which gives the Commission the authority to restrict any person from participating in a distribution of penny stock, if the Commission finds that such a restriction would be in the public interest.

 

Rule 144 Risks

 

Sales of our Common Stock under Rule 144 could reduce the price of our stock. There are 452,450,000 issued and outstanding shares of our Common Stock that Rule 144 of the Securities Act defines as restricted securities.

 

These shares will be subject to the resale restrictions of Rule 144, should we hereinafter cease being deemed a “shell company”. In general, persons holding restricted securities, including affiliates, must hold their shares for a period of at least twelve months, affiliates may not sell more than 1.0% of the total issued and outstanding shares in any 90-day period, and affiliates must resell the shares in an unsolicited brokerage transaction at the market price. The availability for sale of substantial amounts of Common Stock under Rule 144 could reduce prevailing market prices for our securities.

 

No audit or compensation committee

 

Because we do not have an audit or compensation committee, stockholders will have to rely on our entire Board of Directors, none of which are independent, to perform these functions. We do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent directors. Indeed, we do not have any audit or compensation committee. These functions are performed by our Board of Directors as a whole. No members of our Board of Directors are independent directors. Thus, there is a potential conflict in that Board members who are also part of management will participate in discussions concerning management compensation and audit issues that may affect management decisions.

 

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Security laws exposure

 

We are subject to compliance with securities laws, which exposes us to potential liabilities, including potential rescission rights. We may offer to sell our shares of our Common Stock to investors pursuant to certain exemptions from the registration requirements of the Securities Act, as well as those of various state securities laws. The basis for relying on such exemptions is factual; that is, the applicability of such exemptions depends upon our conduct and that of those persons contacting prospective investors and making the offering. We may not seek any legal opinion to the effect that any such offering would be exempt from registration under any federal or state law. Instead, we may elect to relay upon the operative facts as the basis for such exemption, including information provided by investor themselves.

 

If any such offering did not qualify for such exemption, an investor would have the right to rescind its purchase of the securities if it so desired. It is possible that if an investor should seek rescission, such investor would succeed. A similar situation prevails under state law in those states where the securities may be offered without registration in reliance on the partial pre-emption from the registration or qualification provisions of such state statutes under the National Securities Markets Improvement Act of 1996. If investors were successful in seeking rescission, we would face severe financial demands that could adversely affect our business and operations. Additionally, if we did not in fact qualify for the exemptions upon which we have relied, we may become subject to significant fines and penalties imposed by the Commission and state securities agencies.

 

No cash dividends

 

Because we do not intend to pay any cash dividends on our Common Stock, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them. We intend to retain any future earnings to finance the development and expansion of our business. We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on shares of our Common Stock in the foreseeable future. Unless we pay dividends, our stockholders will not be able to receive a return on their shares unless they sell them. There is no assurance that stockholders will be able to sell shares of our Common Stock when desired.

 

We cannot assure you that a market will develop for our Common Stock or what the market price of our Common Stock will be.

 

There is a limited trading market for our Common Stock. There is no assurance that an active market for our Common Stock will develop as a result of our operation of YDTC even if we are successful. If a market does not develop or is not sustained, it may be difficult for you to sell your shares of Common Stock at an attractive price or at all. We cannot predict the prices at which our Common Stock will trade. It is possible that, in future quarters, our operating results may be below the expectations of securities analysts or investors. As a result of these and other factors, the price of our Common Stock may decline or may never become liquid.

 

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Risks Related to Industry

 

A decline in the popularity of EVs could adversely impact our business.

 

Because our operations are affected by general economic conditions and consumer tastes, our future success is unpredictable. The demand for EVs tends to be highly sensitive to consumers’ disposable incomes, and thus a decline in general economic conditions could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition and the price of our Common Stock.

 

Public tastes are unpredictable and subject to change and may be affected by changes in the country’s political and social climate. A change in public tastes could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition and the price of our Common Stock.

 

A decline in general economic conditions could adversely affect our business.

 

Our operations are affected by general economic conditions, which generally may affect consumers’ disposable income. The demand for EVs tends to be highly sensitive to the level of consumers’ disposable income. A decline in general economic conditions could reduce the level of discretionary income that our fans and potential fans have to spend on our live and televised entertainment and consumer products, which could adversely affect our revenues.

 

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Use of Proceeds

 

We will receive gross proceeds of up to $1,200,000 from the sale of shares we are registering to sell at $0.01 per share, in an offering conducted by our officers and directors on a best-efforts basis.

 

The net proceeds to us from the sale of the shares which we intend to offer to new investors, after the offering expenses detailed herein, would be a maximum of $1,150,000. We do not intend to engage any broker/dealers for the sale of the shares, and thus do not expect to pay any sales commissions.

 

These proceeds would be received from time to time as sales of these shares are made by us. As set forth in the following table, we will use those proceeds primarily for payment of general corporate purposes with the remainder used for administrative and legal expenses for operations. We intend to use the proceeds in the following order of priority:

 

    Assumed
Offering
#1(1)(5)
    Percent     Assumed
Offering
#2(2)(5)
    Percent     Assumed
Offering
#3(3)(5)
    Percent     Maximum
Offering(4)(5)
    Percent  
Offering Expenses   $ 50,000       16.7 %   $ 50,000       8.3 %   $ 50,000       5.6 %   $ 50,000       4.2 %
Administrative Expenses   $ 50,000       16.7 %   $ 50,000       8.3 %   $ 50,000       5.6 %   $ 50,000       4.2 %
General Corporate Purposes   $ 150,000       50.0 %   $ 420,000       70.0 %   $ 720,000       80.0 %   $ 1,020,000       85.0 %
Legal and Professional Fees   $ 50,000       16.7 %   $ 80,000       13.3 %   $ 80,000       8.9 %   $ 80,000       6.7 %
Total   $ 300,000       100 %   $ 600,000       100 %   $ 900,000       100 %   $ 1,200,000       100 %

 

 
(1) Assumes that we only raise 25% in this offering. This offering is conducted on a best-efforts basis with no minimum; therefore, we could raise significantly less than $1,200,000.
(2) Assumes that we only raise 50% in this offering. This offering is conducted on a best-efforts basis with no minimum; therefore, we could raise significantly less than $1,200,000.
(3) Assumes that we only raise 75% in this offering. This offering is conducted on a best-efforts basis with no minimum; therefore, we could raise significantly less than $1,200,000.
(4) Assumes that we raise the full amount of our Maximum Offering hereunder, or $1,200,000. This offering is conducted on a best-efforts basis with no minimum; therefore, we could raise significantly less than $1,200,000.
(5) The Offering is being sold by our officers and directors, who will not receive any compensation for their efforts. No sales fees or commissions will be paid to such officers or directors. Shares may be sold by registered broker or dealers who are members of the NASD and who enter into a Participating Dealer Agreement with the Company. Such brokers or dealers may receive commissions up to ten percent (10%) of the price of the Shares sold.

 

The above estimated amounts are only for initial working purposes since we do not know how much we will need to spend on these items. Even if we are able to sell the maximum shares, we do not know how long these funds will last, and we have no other specific plans for raising additional funds. The portion of any net proceeds not immediately required will be invested in certificates of deposit or similar short-term interest bearing instruments.

 

We are dependent on $400,000 of the proceeds of this offering to finance our operations and grow the Company and its subsidiaries for the next 12 months. While the Company is unlikely to generate this amount in net profits over the next twelve months, if we are unable to raise such amount in this offering, our officers and directors will likely advance the Company the funds. The majority of the proceeds will go toward corporate overhead.

 

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Determination of Offering Price

 

Our offering price of $0.01 per share was arbitrarily determined based upon a significant discount to the current market price. Accordingly, the offering price should not be considered an indication of the actual value of our securities.

 

There is no assurance that our common stock will trade at market prices in excess of the offering price hereunder as prices for the common stock in any public market which may develop will be determined in the marketplace and may be influenced by many factors, including the depth and liquidity of the market for the common stock, investor perception of us and general economic and market conditions.

 

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Dilution

 

We are offering our common stock at a price per share that is significantly more than the price per share paid by our current stockholders for our common stock, but significantly less than the current market price of our common stock. We are offering for sale up to 120,000,000 shares of common stock with $1,150,000 of the proceeds going to the Company. If you purchase Shares in this offering, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution.

 

Dilution represents the difference between the price per share paid by purchasers in this offering and the net tangible book value per share. Net tangible book value per share represents our net tangible assets (our total tangible assets less our total liabilities), divided by the number of shares of Common Stock outstanding at the time of the offering, 455,500,000 issued and outstanding shares of Common Stock. As of December 31, 2022, our net tangible book value per share was ($0.0007) per share.

 

The table below illustrates the pro forma per share dilution described above assuming 120,000,000 shares are sold.

 

After giving effect to the sale of the maximum of 120,000,000 Shares being offered in this offering, at $0.01 per Share, and the payment of expenses related to the offering, our pro forma net tangible book value would be $0.0015 and increase by $0.0021 per share.

 

The table below illustrates the pro forma per share dilution described above assuming 90,000,000 shares are sold.

 

After giving effect to the sale of 75% of the Shares (90,000,000) shares being offered in this offering, at $0.01 per Share, and the payment of expenses related to the offering, our pro forma net tangible book value would be $0.0010 and increase by $0.0017 per share.

 

The table below illustrates the pro forma per share dilution described above assuming 60,000,000 shares are sold.

 

After giving effect to the sale of 50% of the Shares (60,000,000 shares) being offered in this offering, at $0.01 per Share, and the payment of expenses related to the offering, our pro forma net tangible book value would be $0.0005 and increase by $0.0011 per share.

 

The table below illustrates the pro forma per share dilution described above assuming 30,000,000 shares are sold.

 

After giving effect to the sale of 25% of the Shares (30,000,000 shares) being offered in this offering, at $0.01 per Share, and the payment of expenses related to the offering, our pro forma net tangible book value would be ($0.0001) and increase by $0.0006 per share.

 

The table below illustrates the pro forma per share dilution described above assuming 12,000,000 shares are sold.

 

After giving effect to the sale of 10% of the Shares (12,000,000 shares) being offered in this offering, at $0.01 per Share, and the payment of expenses related to the offering, our pro forma net tangible book value would be ($0.0005) an increase by $0.0002 per share.

 

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The table below indicates the relative aggregate cash investment and stock ownership of new investors in this offering:

 

Percentage of offering sold   100%   75%     50%   25%     10%
Price per share   $ 0.01     $ 0.01     $ 0.01     $ 0.01     $ 0.01  
Total shares purchased     120,000,000       90,000,000       60,000,000       30,000,000       12,000,000  
Total proceeds of shares purchased   $ 1,200,000     $ 900,000     $ 600,000     $ 300,000     $ 120,000  
less: offering costs   $ (50,000 )   $ (50,000 )   $ (50,000 )   $ (50,000 )   $ (50,000 )
Net proceeds from offering   $ 1,150,000     $ 850,000     $ 550,000     $ 250,000     $ 70,000  
                                         
Net Tangible book value as of December 31, 2022   $ (63,389 )   $ (63,389 )   $ (63,389 )   $ (63,389 )   $ (63,389 )
Net Tangible book value after the offering   $ 1,086,611     $ 786,611     $ 486,611     $ 186,611     $ 6,611  
                                         
Total shares issued at time of offering     455,500,000       455,500,000       455,500,000       455,500,000       455,500,000  
Total shares issued after the offering     575,500,000       545,500,000       515,500,000       485,500,000       467,500,000  
                                         
Net tangible book value per share as of December 31, 2022   $ (0.0001 )   $ (0.0001 )   $ (0.0001 )   $ (0.0001 )   $ (0.0001 )
Net tangible book value per share after the offering   $ 0.0019     $ 0.0014     $ 0.0009     $ 0.0004     $ 0.0000  
Net tangible book value per share increase to present shareholders   $ 0.0020     $ 0.0016     $ 0.0011     $ 0.0005     $ 0.0002  
Dilution to investors   $ 0.0081     $ 0.0086     $ 0.0091     $ 0.0096     $ 0.0100  
                                         
Percentage of ownership to present shareholders after the offering     79.1 %     83.5 %     88.4 %     93.8 %     97.4 %
                                         
Purchasers of stock in the offering                                        
Price per Share     0.01       0.01       0.01       0.01       0.01  

 

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Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes thereto.

 

Forward Looking Statements

 

The following information specifies certain forward-looking statements of the management of our Company. Forward-looking statements are statements that estimate the happening of future events and are not based on historical fact. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, such as may, shall, could, expect, estimate, anticipate, predict, probable, possible, should, continue, or similar terms, variations of those terms or the negative of those terms. The forward-looking statements specified in the following information statement have been compiled by our management on the basis of assumptions made by management and considered by management to be reasonable. Our future operating results, however, are impossible to predict and no representation, guaranty, or warranty is to be inferred from those forward-looking statements.

 

The assumptions used for purposes of the forward-looking statements specified in the following information represent estimates of future events and are subject to uncertainty as to possible changes in economic, legislative, industry, and other circumstances. As a result, the identification and interpretation of data and other information and their use in developing and selecting assumptions from and among reasonable alternatives require the exercise of judgment. To the extent that the assumed events do not occur, the outcome may vary substantially from anticipated or projected results, and, accordingly, no opinion is expressed on the achievability of those forward-looking statements. We cannot guaranty that any of the assumptions relating to the forward-looking statements specified in the following information are accurate, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements. Such forward-looking statements include statements regarding our anticipated financial and operating results, our liquidity, goals, and plans.

 

All forward-looking statements in this Form S-1 are based on information available to us as of the date of this report, and we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

Alpine Auto Brokers (the “Company”) was organized as Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC in the state of Utah in December 2010. The Company sold automobiles and provided dealer services, for a fee.

 

The Company was incorporated as Alpine Auto Brokers, Inc. on May 12, 2011, in the State of Nevada for the purpose of locating and purchasing used vehicles at auctions, from private individuals, from other dealers and selling these vehicles specifically to consumers in Salt Lake City, Utah. On January 1, 2014, the Company acquired 100 percent of the membership interests of Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC, a Utah Limited Liability Company formed on December 10, 2010. The Company operated through its wholly owned subsidiary Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC.

 

The acquisition was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in which the operating entity’s historical financial statements become those of the “accounting acquirer” in which historical operating results are presented from inception.

 

The Company has been dormant since October 27, 2016.

 

On August 18, 2021, the Eight Judicial District Court in Clark County, Nevada Case No: A-20-816619-B appointed Custodian Ventures, managed by David Lazar as the Company’s Receiver.

 

On January 28, 2022, the Company, amended its articles of incorporation change its name back to Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. The change was made because the Company failed to complete its prior name change with FINRA.

 

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On February 9, 2022, as a result of a private transactions, 10,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value per share (the “Shares”) of the “Company”, were transferred from Custodian Ventures, LLC to MetaVerse Investment Group (the “Purchaser”). As a result, the Purchaser became the holder of 90% of the voting rights of the issued and outstanding share capital of the Company on a fully-diluted basis of the Company, and became the controlling shareholder. The consideration paid for the Shares was $420,000, with $20,000 being held back pending certain public filings of the Company. The source of the cash consideration for the Shares was personal funds of the Purchaser. In connection with the transaction, David Lazar released the Company from all debts owed to him and/or Custodian Ventures, LLC.

 

On February 9, 2022, the existing director and officer resigned immediately. Accordingly, David Lazar, serving as a director and an officer, ceased to be the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President, Treasurer, Secretary and a Director. At the effective date of the transfer, Zibin Xiao consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on February 9, 2022, Zonghan Wu consented to act as the new CFO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company.

 

On June 27, 2022, Zibin Xiao resigned as the Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on June 27, 2022, Yufeng Zhang consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. As such, the Company recognized the assets and liabilities of NHIL acquired in the reorganization, at their historical carrying amounts.

 

As a result of the above transaction, the Company’s corporate structure which is set forth as follows:

 

 

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Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was organized in 2022 to engage in the business of constructing and operating charging stations for electric vehicles (“EV”). Our ambition is to build YDTC into a central participant in this growing industry.

 

In this, our first year of operation, we are focusing our efforts on building a group of consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations. We are undertaking this top-down approach to the industry in part because we lack sufficient financial resources to compete directly with the major participant in the industry. But of equal importance is the opportunity for market impact that we will gain by positioning ourselves as leaders in the charging station industry. As those to whom we provide our services and guidance spread throughout the EV world, they will advertise our brand as their authoritative source for technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry, and so our brand will gain value among the relevant participants in the EV world. Our goal is that, when we have secured the financing necessary to compete in the charging station community, we will already be known and identified with quality and know-how related to charging stations.

 

Our main business at this time, therefore, is to provide consulting services relating to the planning and design of new energy charging piles to customer in Guangdong Province of the PRC. Our customers are enterprises that are either initiating their participation in this industry in general or expanding their operations to Guangdong. In either case, a customer who engages YDTC, will receive, among other things:

 

a survey report on the distribution of new energy charging piles that have been built and are under construction in the district of Guangzhou City in which the customer intends to distribute its stations;,

 

a business plan based upon an analysis of the existing distribution of charging piles in the target market;

 

a site selection plan identifying prospective locations where charging piles can be built;

 

a plan of the electric equipment design plus the type of charging piles to be used;

 

a plan of the construction and the construction method; as well as

 

the design and sample drawings of the foundation for the piles,

 

9. Corporate History and Structure

 

On January 10, 2022, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was incorporated pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On June 16, 2022, Jiayue Yang established a holding company, National Holdings Investment Ltd (NHIL), under the laws of the British Virgin Islands (BVI).

 

On October 04, 2022, NHIL acquired 100% ownership interest in YDTC. YDTC becomes a wholly foreign owned enterprise pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to Jiayue Yang. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

Between June 16, 2022 and October 4, 2022, NHIL was a private company owned by Jiayue Yang, with no assets and no relationship to the Company. Upon acquiring YDTC and before February 20, 2023, NHIL was wholly-owned by Jiayue Yang and held YDTC as a wholly-owned subsidiary.

 

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Competitive Strengths

 

The following are the competitive strengths of Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Top-down approach: The company’s strategy of targeting consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations is a smart move, as it allows the company to establish itself as a leader in the industry while building its financial resources to compete directly with major participants. This approach will help the company gain valuable insights into the industry while building its brand reputation.

 

Technological and commercial knowledge: YDTC’s focus on providing its clients with technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry positions the company as a credible and authoritative source of information in the EV world. This knowledge base will be useful when the company is ready to enter the market as a direct competitor.

 

Brand reputation: By positioning itself as a leader in the charging station industry through its consulting services, YDTC is laying the foundation for a strong brand reputation. As clients spread the word about the quality of its services, the company’s brand value will increase, making it easier to compete with major players in the industry.

 

Growing industry: The electric vehicle market is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years, and the need for charging stations will increase accordingly. As a company focused solely on charging stations, YDTC is well-positioned to take advantage of this growth and establish itself as a significant player in the industry.

 

Strategic location: Dongguan is a key manufacturing hub in China, and the company’s location there gives it access to a large pool of skilled workers, suppliers, and potential customers. This strategic location could give YDTC an edge over competitors located in less advantageous areas.

 

The Charging Station Industry in China

 

In recent decades, China’s rapid economic growth has enabled more and more consumers to buy their own cars. The result has been the creation of the largest automotive market in the world—but also serious urban air pollution, high greenhouse gas emissions, and growing dependence on oil imports. To counteract those troubling trends, the Chinese government has imposed policies to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (EVs). Since buying an EV costs more than buying a conventional internal combustion engine vehicle, in 2009 the government began to provide generous subsidies for EV purchases. As a result, China became the world’s largest market for EV’s, accounting for approximately 50% of global sales. In 2020 1.1 million EVs were produced and sold in China. The central government’s “New Energy Vehicle Industry Development Plan (2021 - 2035) predicted that sales of new energy vehicles would account for 20% of car sales in China in 2025. In fact, during 2022, EV sales represented 22% of new car sales.

 

As the number of EV purchases grew, paying for the subsidies became extremely costly for the government. As a result, beginning in 2020, China’s government began to phase out the subsidies and instead rely on a mandate imposed on car manufacturers. The mandate requires that a certain percent of all vehicles sold by a manufacturer each year must be battery-powered. To avoid financial penalties, every year manufacturers must earn a stipulated number of points, which are awarded for each EV produced based on a complex formula that takes into account range, energy efficiency, performance, and more. The requirements get tougher over time, with a goal of having EVs make up 40% of all car sales in China by 2030.

 

The mandate on vehicle manufacturers to produce EVs is supplemented by a number of Chinese government policies:

 

Tax exemptions. The Chinese government exempts electric vehicles from consumption and sales taxes, which can save purchasers tens of thousands of RMB (equivalent to thousands of dollars). It also waives 50% of vehicle registration fees for electric vehicles.

 

Procurement. The Chinese government also uses its procurement power to promote electric vehicles. A May 2016 order required that half of new vehicles purchased by China’s central government be new energy vehicles within five years.

 

New auto factory requirements. Chinese regulations strongly discourage the construction of factories for manufacturing internal combustion engine vehicles only. Subject to exceptions that are difficult to satisfy, any new vehicle factory is required to include capacity for the construction of electric vehicles.

 

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Since EVs will be useless without charging stations, the Chinese central government has promoted the development of EV charging infrastructure as a matter of national policy. As the central government has withdrawn subsidies for purchase of EVs, it has redirected a significant portion of those funds to support the development of EV infrastructure, primarily charging stations. In November 2020, the General Office of the State Council promulgated its “Development Plan of the New Energy Vehicle Industry (2021 - 2035), in which it mandated financial support for the construction of charging stations and proposed preferential policies with respect to allocation of space in parking lots to charging stations. China State Grid and China Southern Grid, China’s two state-owned electric utilities, both have programs to promote the development of electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

Guangdong Province has also been aggressive in support of EVs and EV infrastructure. During 2022 the number of EVs sold in Guangdong Province doubled compared to sales in 2021, and now one-eighth of the EVs manufactured in the PRC are manufactured in Guangdong Province. To support this push toward EVs, Guangdong Province now has more charging stations than any other province in China – and three times as many charging facilities as are located in the entire United States. The Province subsidizes certain purchases of EVs, and encourages insurance companies to provide preferential premiums for EVs. The government of Guangdong Province gives every indication that it will continue to support the expansion of the charging station network indefinitely, with an ultimate goal of maximizing the conversion of vehicular traffic to electric.

 

Competition

 

The Company is operating in the growing market of new energy charging piles, which is becoming increasingly competitive due to the growing demand for electric vehicles and the government’s push towards cleaner energy. The competition the Company is facing can be broadly categorized into the following:

 

1. Established players: The new energy charging pile market is already populated with a number of established players such as State Grid, Southern Power Grid, and other major energy companies. These companies have a strong brand presence, financial resources, and expertise in the energy sector. They also have established relationships with customers and are likely to be strong competitors for the Company.

 

2. New entrants: The market for new energy charging piles is attracting a growing number of new entrants, ranging from start-ups to established companies diversifying into the market. These competitors are also likely to be aggressive in pursuing market share and have the potential to disrupt the market.

 

3. Technological changes: The charging technology for electric vehicles is constantly evolving, and competitors are investing heavily in developing new charging technologies such as wireless charging, fast charging, and ultra-fast charging. These technological changes could lead to new entrants and disrupt existing market players.

 

4. Regulatory environment: The regulatory environment for the new energy charging pile market is evolving rapidly, and competitors are likely to be affected by changes in regulations and policies related to the development of the new energy industry. These changes could favor some players and disadvantage others.

 

In summary, the Company is operating in a highly competitive market, facing competition from established players, new entrants, technological changes, and regulatory environment changes. The Company are developing a strong value proposition and endeavoring to build a competitive advantage to succeed in the market.

 

Marketing

 

The Company is developing a brand identity that reflects the Company’s values and mission. This includes developing a unique logo, website, and marketing materials that are visually appealing and clearly communicate the Company’s value proposition. The Company also plans to further strengthen our marketing efforts and improve our brand awareness through the following actions:

 

1. Leverage social media: Social media platforms such as WeChat, Weibo, and LinkedIn can be used to build awareness of our brand, share Company news and updates, and engage with potential customers. The Company can also consider partnering with influencers in the electric vehicle or sustainability space to reach a wider audience.

 

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2. Attend industry events: The Company will attend industry events such as trade shows, conferences, and seminars to network with potential customers and partners. These events can also provide valuable insights into industry trends and customer needs.

 

3. Foster partnerships: The Company is seeking out partnerships with property developers, government agencies, and other companies in the new energy space. By partnering with these organizations, YDTC can expand its reach and access new customer segments.

 

4. Overall, by developing a brand identity, leveraging social media, attending industry events, and fostering partnerships, The Company can build awareness of its brand and generate leads in the highly competitive market.

 

10. PRC Laws and Regulations Affecting Our Business

 

There are several PRC laws and regulations that could affect the Company’s business, including:

 

Regulations on new energy vehicles: The Chinese government has implemented a number of regulations and policies aimed at promoting the development and adoption of new energy vehicles, including electric vehicles. These policies could create opportunities for the Company as demand for electric vehicle charging infrastructure increases.

 

It is important for YDTC to stay up-to-date with any changes or developments in these and other relevant laws and regulations in order to ensure compliance and mitigate any potential risks or challenges to its business operations.

 

Growth Plan

 

The following is a growth plan for Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Expand consulting services: YDTC should continue to expand its consulting services to attract more clients and establish itself as a top-tier consulting firm in the EV charging station industry. The company can do this by developing and offering new services such as feasibility studies, site selection, and project management.

 

Develop charging station technology: YDTC should invest in research and development to improve the technology used in its charging stations. By developing more efficient, user-friendly, and innovative charging stations, the company can differentiate itself from competitors and attract more clients. Additionally, YDTC could consider developing its own branded charging stations to sell directly to customers.

 

Form strategic partnerships: YDTC should form strategic partnerships with other players in the EV industry, such as EV manufacturers, energy providers, and other charging station companies. These partnerships could provide access to new markets, customers, and technology, as well as help the company to stay up-to-date with the latest industry trends.

 

Raise capital: To fund its expansion plans, YDTC should consider raising capital through various means, such as placement, venture capital, private equity, or debt financing. With adequate funding, YDTC can invest in research and development, expand its operations, and compete with major players in the EV charging station industry.

 

Overall, YDTC’s growth plan should focus on expanding its consulting services, improving its technology, forming strategic partnerships, and raising capital to achieve its goal of becoming a central participant in the growing EV charging station industry.

 

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Results of Operations for the Year Ended December 31, 2022 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2021

 

Revenue

 

The Company had no operations or revenue the year ended December 31, 2022 and the same period in 2021.

 

Operating expenses

 

Operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $ 29,740 compared to $ 345,356 for the year ended December 31, 2021. The decrease in operating expenses in the year December 31, 2022 compared to the same period in 2021 is due to the one off Stock based compensation $300,000 in the year December 31, 2021.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We had $0 in cash on hand as of December 31, 2022.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was ($29,740) for the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to ($45,356) for the year ended December 31, 2021. The material decreases in cash used in operating activities during the year ended December 31, 2022 was primarily due to the savings from change of service providers.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities during the year ended December 31, 2022 was $0 compared to $0 for the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $29,740 for the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to $45,356 for the year ended December 31, 2021. The material decrease during the 2022 period was due to less capital contributions from director to pay less operating expenses.

 

Results of Operations for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2023 Compared to the Six Months Ended June 30, 2022

 

Revenue

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2023, we recorded $129,781 in revenue compared to $0 for the same period in 2022. The increase in revenue is based on the operations of the reverse merger target company.

 

Operating costs and expenses

 

Operating expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2023 was $137,865 compared to $10,959 for the six months ended June 30, 2022. The increase in operating expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2023 compared to the same period in 2022 is due to the expenses associated with the new subsidiary Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd. (YDTC)

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We had $25,163 in cash on hand as of June 30, 2023.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was $26,419 for the six months ended June 30, 2023, compared to ($10,959) for the six months ended June 30, 2022. The material increases in cash used in operating activities during the six months ended June 30, 2023 was primarily due to the operating activities of the new subsidiary Sichuan Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd. Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd. (YDTC)

 

Net cash provided by investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2023 was $0 compared to $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2022.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2023, compared to $10,959 for the six months ended June 30, 2022. The material decrease during the six months ended June 30, 2023 was due to the 0 proceeds from related party loans.

 

Financial Impact of COVID-19

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected how we are operating our business, and the duration and extent to which this will impact our future results of operations and overall financial performance remains uncertain. The COVID-19 pandemic is having widespread, rapidly evolving, and unpredictable impacts on global society, economies, financial markets, and business practices. Federal, state and foreign governments have implemented measures to contain the virus, including social distancing, travel restrictions, border closures, limitations on public gatherings, work from home, and closure of non-essential businesses. To protect the health and well-being of our employees, partners, and third-party service providers, we have implemented work-from-home requirements, made substantial modifications to employee travel policies, and cancelled or shifted marketing and other corporate events to virtual-only formats for the near future. While we continue to monitor the situation and may adjust our current policies as more information and public health guidance become available, such precautionary measures could negatively affect our customer success efforts, sales and marketing efforts, delay and lengthen our sales cycles, or create operational or other challenges, any of which could harm our business and results of operations.

 

In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the operations of our current enterprise customers, as well as many potential enterprise customers, and may continue to disrupt their operations, for an indefinite period of time, including as a result of travel restrictions and/or business shutdowns, uncertainty in the financial markets, or other harm to their businesses and financial results, resulting in delayed purchasing decisions, extended payment terms, and postponed or cancelled projects, all of which could negatively impact our business and results of operations, including our revenue and cash flows.

 

Beginning in March 2020, the U.S. and global economies have reacted negatively in response to worldwide concerns due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. These factors also may adversely impact enterprise and government spending on technology as well as such customers’ ability to pay for our products and services on an ongoing basis. For example, some businesses in industries particularly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, such as travel, hospitality, retail, and oil and gas, have significantly cut or eliminated capital expenditures. A prolonged economic downturn could adversely affect technology spending, demand for our offerings, which could have a negative impact on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Any resulting instability in the financial markets could also adversely affect the value of our common stock, our ability to refinance our indebtedness, and our access to capital.

 

The ultimate duration and extent of the impact from the COVID-19 pandemic depends on future developments that cannot be accurately forecasted at this time, such as the severity and transmission rate of the disease, the actions of governments, businesses, and individuals in response to the pandemic, the extent and effectiveness of containment actions, the impact on economic activity and the impact of these and other factors on our employees, partners, and third-party service providers. These uncertainties may increase variability in our future results of operations and adversely impact our ability to accurately forecast changes in our business performance and financial condition in future periods. If we are not able to respond to and manage the impact of such events effectively or if global economic conditions do not improve, or deteriorate further, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows could be adversely affected.

 

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Employees

 

We currently have 8 employees, two of which are officers and directors of ALTB. We anticipate hiring additional employees in the next twelve months. We anticipate hiring necessary personnel based on an as needed basis only on a per contract basis to be compensated directly from revenues.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

During the years ended December 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021 we did not engage in any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in item 303(a)(4) of the Commission’s Regulation S-K.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of our senior management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded as of the Evaluation Date that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective such that the information relating to us required to be disclosed in our Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) reports (i) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms, and (ii) is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and chief financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. The Company’s former management abandoned all operations for many years, and only recently did the Company appoint new management to make filings with the SEC on behalf of the Company. As of December 31, 2022 we have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective.

 

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives. Our Company has been dormant since 2007. As a result, our management did not evaluate the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021 based on the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013). without such an evaluation, our management concluded that we did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022 based on the COSO framework criteria, as more fully described below. This was due to deficiencies that existed in the design or operation of our internal controls over financial reporting that adversely affected our internal controls and that may be considered to be material weaknesses.

 

The matters involving internal controls and procedures that our management considered to be material weaknesses under the standards of the PCAOB were: (1) lack of a functioning audit committee, (2) lack of a majority of outside directors on our Board of Directors, resulting in ineffective oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures; (3) inadequate segregation of duties consistent with control objectives; (4) lack of management of the company from 2007 until 2021; and (5) lack of disclosure controls. The aforementioned material weaknesses were identified by our Chief Executive and Financial Officer in connection with the review of our financial statements as of December 31, 2022.

 

Management believes that the material weaknesses set forth above did not have an effect on our financial results because the activity during this period was nominal. However, management believes that the lack of a functioning audit committee and the lack of a majority of outside Directors on our Board of Directors results in ineffective oversight in the establishment and monitoring of required internal controls and procedures, which could result in a material misstatement in our financial statements in future periods.

 

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Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the periods ended December 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

The SEC has defined a company’s critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of the Company’s financial condition and results of operations and which require the Company to make its most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain. Based on this definition, we have identified the critical accounting policies and judgments addressed below. We also have other key accounting policies that are significant to understanding our results.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and are expressed in Canadian dollars.

 

Management’s Representation of Interim Financial Statements

 

The accompanying unaudited financial statements have been prepared by the Company without audit pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The Company uses the same accounting policies in preparing quarterly and annual financial statements. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted as allowed by such rules and regulations, and management believes that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. These financial statements include all of the adjustments, which in the opinion of management are necessary to a fair presentation of financial position and results of operations. All such adjustments are of a normal and recurring nature. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of results for a full year. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes thereto on December 31, 2020.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The most significant estimates relate to revenue recognition, valuation of accounts receivable and inventories, income taxes, and contingencies. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience, known or expected trends, and various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable given the quality of information available as of the date of these financial statements. The results of these assumptions provide the basis for making estimates about the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) outlines a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers. The guidance provided in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606 (“ASC 606”) requires entities to use a five-step model to recognize revenue by allocating the consideration from contracts to performance obligations on a relative standalone selling price basis. Revenue is recognized when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services in an amount that reflects the consideration that the entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. The standard also requires new disclosures regarding the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. ASC 606 also includes Subtopic 340-40, Other Assets and Deferred Costs – Contracts with Customers, which requires the deferral of incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer.

 

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Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less at the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit with banks and money market funds, the fair value of which approximates cost. The Company maintains its cash balances with a high-credit-quality financial institution. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts, and management believes the Company is not exposed to any significant credit risk on its cash and cash equivalents. As of December 31, 2021, the balance of cash was $-0-.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable are customer obligations due under normal trade terms which are recorded at net realizable value. The Company establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts based on management’s assessment of the collectability of trade receivables. A considerable amount of judgment is required in assessing the amount of the allowance. The Company makes judgments about the creditworthiness of each customer based on ongoing credit evaluations and monitors current economic trends that might impact the level of credit losses in the future. If the financial condition of the customers were to deteriorate, resulting in their inability to make payments, a specific allowance will be required.

 

Recovery of bad debt amounts previously written off is recorded as a reduction of bad debt expense in the period the payment is collected. If the Company’s actual collection experience changes, revisions to its allowance may be required. After all, attempts to collect a receivable have failed, the receivable is written off against the allowance.

 

As of December 31, 2022, the balance of accounts receivable was 0.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under FASB ASC 740, Accounting for Income Taxes (“ASC 740”). Under ASC 740, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Under ASC 740, the effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. ASC 740-10-05, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes prescribes a recognition threshold and a measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. For those benefits to be recognized, a tax position must be more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination by taxing authorities.

 

The amount recognized is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. The Company assesses the validity of its conclusions regarding uncertain tax positions on a quarterly basis to determine if facts or circumstances have arisen that might cause it to change its judgment regarding the likelihood of a tax position’s sustainability under audit.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The reporting currency of the Company is the US dollar.

 

Basic and Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

The Company computes net income (loss) per share in accordance with FASB ASC 260, Earnings per Share which requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common stockholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

There are no recent accounting pronouncements that impact the Company’s operations.

 

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Our Business

 

Alpine Auto Brokers (the “Company”) was organized as Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC in the state of Utah in December 2010. The Company sold automobiles and provided dealer services, for a fee.

 

The Company was incorporated as Alpine Auto Brokers, Inc. on May 12, 2011, in the State of Nevada for the purpose of locating and purchasing used vehicles at auctions, from private individuals, from other dealers and selling these vehicles specifically to consumers in Salt Lake City, Utah. On January 1, 2014, the Company acquired 100 percent of the membership interests of Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC, a Utah Limited Liability Company formed on December 10, 2010. The Company operated through its wholly owned subsidiary Alpine Auto Brokers, LLC.

 

The acquisition was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization in which the operating entity’s historical financial statements become those of the “accounting acquirer” in which historical operating results are presented from inception.

 

The Company has been dormant since October 27, 2016.

 

On August 18, 2021, the Eight Judicial District Court in Clark County, Nevada Case No: A-20-816619-B appointed Custodian Ventures, managed by David Lazar as the Company’s Receiver.

 

On January 28, 2022, the Company, amended its articles of incorporation change its name back to Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. The change was made because the Company failed to complete its prior name change with FINRA.

 

On February 9, 2022, as a result of a private transactions, 10,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value per share (the “Shares”) of the “Company”, were transferred from Custodian Ventures, LLC to MetaVerse Investment Group (the “Purchaser”). As a result, the Purchaser became the holder of 90% of the voting rights of the issued and outstanding share capital of the Company on a fully-diluted basis of the Company, and became the controlling shareholder. The consideration paid for the Shares was $420,000, with $20,000 being held back pending certain public filings of the Company. The source of the cash consideration for the Shares was personal funds of the Purchaser. In connection with the transaction, David Lazar released the Company from all debts owed to him and/or Custodian Ventures, LLC.

 

On February 9, 2022, the existing director and officer resigned immediately. Accordingly, David Lazar, serving as a director and an officer, ceased to be the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, President, Treasurer, Secretary and a Director. At the effective date of the transfer, Zibin Xiao consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on February 9, 2022, Zonghan Wu consented to act as the new CFO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company.

 

On June 27, 2022, Zibin Xiao resigned as the Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors. Also on June 27, 2022, Yufeng Zhang consented to act as the new Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company. As such, the Company recognized the assets and liabilities of NHIL acquired in the reorganization, at their historical carrying amounts.

 

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As a result of the above transaction, the Company’s corporate structure which is set forth as follows:

 

 

Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was organized in 2022 to engage in the business of constructing and operating charging stations for electric vehicles (“EV”). Our ambition is to build YDTC into a central participant in this growing industry.

 

In this, our first year of operation, we are focusing our efforts on building a group of consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations. We are undertaking this top-down approach to the industry in part because we lack sufficient financial resources to compete directly with the major participant in the industry. But of equal importance is the opportunity for market impact that we will gain by positioning ourselves as leaders in the charging station industry. As those to whom we provide our services and guidance spread throughout the EV world, they will advertise our brand as their authoritative source for technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry, and so our brand will gain value among the relevant participants in the EV world. Our goal is that, when we have secured the financing necessary to compete in the charging station community, we will already be known and identified with quality and know-how related to charging stations.

 

Our main business at this time, therefore, is to provide consulting services relating to the planning and design of new energy charging piles to customer in Guangdong Province of the PRC. Our customers are enterprises that are either initiating their participation in this industry in general or expanding their operations to Guangdong. In either case, a customer who engages YDTC, will receive, among other things:

 

a survey report on the distribution of new energy charging piles that have been built and are under construction in the district of Guangzhou City in which the customer intends to distribute its stations;,

 

a business plan based upon an analysis of the existing distribution of charging piles in the target market;

 

a site selection plan identifying prospective locations where charging piles can be built;

 

a plan of the electric equipment design plus the type of charging piles to be used;

 

a plan of the construction and the construction method; as well as

 

the design and sample drawings of the foundation for the piles,

 

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Corporate History and Structure

 

On January 10, 2022, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd (YDTC) was incorporated pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On June 16, 2022, Jiayue Yang established a holding company, National Holdings Investment Ltd (NHIL), under the laws of the British Virgin Islands (BVI).

 

On October 04, 2022, NHIL acquired 100% ownership interest in YDTC. YDTC becomes a wholly foreign owned enterprise pursuant to the PRC law.

 

On February 20, 2023, the Company entered into a Definitive Share Exchange Agreement with National Holdings Investment Ltd., a British Virgin Islands corporation (“NHIL”), whereunder the Company acquired 100% ownership interest in NHIL for the issuance of 10,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to Jiayue Yang. NHIL through its China based subsidiaries, Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd., is mainly engaged in the planning and design service consulting business of new energy charging piles. The transaction closed effective February 24, 2023 and has been treated as a business combination, resulting in NHIL becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

Between June 16, 2022 and October 4, 2022, NHIL was a private company owned by Jiayue Yang, with no assets and no relationship to the Company. Upon acquiring YDTC and before February 20, 2023, NHIL was wholly-owned by Jiayue Yang and held YDTC as a wholly-owned subsidiary.

 

Competitive Strengths

 

The following are the competitive strengths of Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Top-down approach: The company’s strategy of targeting consulting clients who are themselves distributors of charging stations is a smart move, as it allows the company to establish itself as a leader in the industry while building its financial resources to compete directly with major participants. This approach will help the company gain valuable insights into the industry while building its brand reputation.

 

Technological and commercial knowledge: YDTC’s focus on providing its clients with technological and commercial knowledge about the charging station industry positions the company as a credible and authoritative source of information in the EV world. This knowledge base will be useful when the company is ready to enter the market as a direct competitor.

 

Brand reputation: By positioning itself as a leader in the charging station industry through its consulting services, YDTC is laying the foundation for a strong brand reputation. As clients spread the word about the quality of its services, the company’s brand value will increase, making it easier to compete with major players in the industry.

 

Growing industry: The electric vehicle market is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years, and the need for charging stations will increase accordingly. As a company focused solely on charging stations, YDTC is well-positioned to take advantage of this growth and establish itself as a significant player in the industry.

 

Strategic location: Dongguan is a key manufacturing hub in China, and the company’s location there gives it access to a large pool of skilled workers, suppliers, and potential customers. This strategic location could give YDTC an edge over competitors located in less advantageous areas.

 

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The Charging Station Industry in China

 

In recent decades, China’s rapid economic growth has enabled more and more consumers to buy their own cars. The result has been the creation of the largest automotive market in the world—but also serious urban air pollution, high greenhouse gas emissions, and growing dependence on oil imports. To counteract those troubling trends, the Chinese government has imposed policies to encourage the adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (EVs). Since buying an EV costs more than buying a conventional internal combustion engine vehicle, in 2009 the government began to provide generous subsidies for EV purchases. As a result, China became the world’s largest market for EV’s, accounting for approximately 50% of global sales. In 2020 1.1 million EVs were produced and sold in China. The central government’s “New Energy Vehicle Industry Development Plan (2021 - 2035) predicted that sales of new energy vehicles would account for 20% of car sales in China in 2025. In fact, during 2022, EV sales represented 22% of new car sales.

 

As the number of EV purchases grew, paying for the subsidies became extremely costly for the government. As a result, beginning in 2020, China’s government began to phase out the subsidies and instead rely on a mandate imposed on car manufacturers. The mandate requires that a certain percent of all vehicles sold by a manufacturer each year must be battery-powered. To avoid financial penalties, every year manufacturers must earn a stipulated number of points, which are awarded for each EV produced based on a complex formula that takes into account range, energy efficiency, performance, and more. The requirements get tougher over time, with a goal of having EVs make up 40% of all car sales in China by 2030.

 

The mandate on vehicle manufacturers to produce EVs is supplemented by a number of Chinese government policies:

 

Tax exemptions. The Chinese government exempts electric vehicles from consumption and sales taxes, which can save purchasers tens of thousands of RMB (equivalent to thousands of dollars). It also waives 50% of vehicle registration fees for electric vehicles.

 

Procurement. The Chinese government also uses its procurement power to promote electric vehicles. A May 2016 order required that half of new vehicles purchased by China’s central government be new energy vehicles within five years.

 

New auto factory requirements. Chinese regulations strongly discourage the construction of factories for manufacturing internal combustion engine vehicles only. Subject to exceptions that are difficult to satisfy, any new vehicle factory is required to include capacity for the construction of electric vehicles.

 

Since EVs will be useless without charging stations, the Chinese central government has promoted the development of EV charging infrastructure as a matter of national policy. As the central government has withdrawn subsidies for purchase of EVs, it has redirected a significant portion of those funds to support the development of EV infrastructure, primarily charging stations. In November 2020, the General Office of the State Council promulgated its “Development Plan of the New Energy Vehicle Industry (2021 - 2035), in which it mandated financial support for the construction of charging stations and proposed preferential policies with respect to allocation of space in parking lots to charging stations. China State Grid and China Southern Grid, China’s two state-owned electric utilities, both have programs to promote the development of electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

 

Guangdong Province has also been aggressive in support of EVs and EV infrastructure. During 2022 the number of EVs sold in Guangdong Province doubled compared to sales in 2021, and now one-eighth of the EVs manufactured in the PRC are manufactured in Guangdong Province. To support this push toward EVs, Guangdong Province now has more charging stations than any other province in China – and three times as many charging facilities as are located in the entire United States. The Province subsidizes certain purchases of EVs, and encourages insurance companies to provide preferential premiums for EVs. The government of Guangdong Province gives every indication that it will continue to support the expansion of the charging station network indefinitely, with an ultimate goal of maximizing the conversion of vehicular traffic to electric.

 

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11. Competition

 

The Company is operating in the growing market of new energy charging piles, which is becoming increasingly competitive due to the growing demand for electric vehicles and the government’s push towards cleaner energy. The competition the Company is facing can be broadly categorized into the following:

 

1. Established players: The new energy charging pile market is already populated with a number of established players such as State Grid, Southern Power Grid, and other major energy companies. These companies have a strong brand presence, financial resources, and expertise in the energy sector. They also have established relationships with customers and are likely to be strong competitors for the Company.

 

2. New entrants: The market for new energy charging piles is attracting a growing number of new entrants, ranging from start-ups to established companies diversifying into the market. These competitors are also likely to be aggressive in pursuing market share and have the potential to disrupt the market.

 

3. Technological changes: The charging technology for electric vehicles is constantly evolving, and competitors are investing heavily in developing new charging technologies such as wireless charging, fast charging, and ultra-fast charging. These technological changes could lead to new entrants and disrupt existing market players.

 

4. Regulatory environment: The regulatory environment for the new energy charging pile market is evolving rapidly, and competitors are likely to be affected by changes in regulations and policies related to the development of the new energy industry. These changes could favor some players and disadvantage others.

 

In summary, the Company is operating in a highly competitive market, facing competition from established players, new entrants, technological changes, and regulatory environment changes. The Company are developing a strong value proposition and endeavoring to build a competitive advantage to succeed in the market.

 

Marketing

 

The Company is developing a brand identity that reflects the Company’s values and mission. This includes developing a unique logo, website, and marketing materials that are visually appealing and clearly communicate the Company’s value proposition. The Company also plans to further strengthen our marketing efforts and improve our brand awareness through the following actions:

 

1. Leverage social media: Social media platforms such as WeChat, Weibo, and LinkedIn can be used to build awareness of our brand, share Company news and updates, and engage with potential customers. The Company can also consider partnering with influencers in the electric vehicle or sustainability space to reach a wider audience.

 

2. Attend industry events: The Company will attend industry events such as trade shows, conferences, and seminars to network with potential customers and partners. These events can also provide valuable insights into industry trends and customer needs.

 

3. Foster partnerships: The Company is seeking out partnerships with property developers, government agencies, and other companies in the new energy space. By partnering with these organizations, YDTC can expand its reach and access new customer segments.

 

4. Overall, by developing a brand identity, leveraging social media, attending industry events, and fostering partnerships, The Company can build awareness of its brand and generate leads in the highly competitive market.

 

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PRC Laws and Regulations Affecting Our Business

 

There are several PRC laws and regulations that could affect the Company’s business, including:

 

Regulations on new energy vehicles: The Chinese government has implemented a number of regulations and policies aimed at promoting the development and adoption of new energy vehicles, including electric vehicles. These policies could create opportunities for the Company as demand for electric vehicle charging infrastructure increases.

 

It is important for YDTC to stay up-to-date with any changes or developments in these and other relevant laws and regulations in order to ensure compliance and mitigate any potential risks or challenges to its business operations.

 

Growth Plan

 

The following is a growth plan for Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd:

 

Expand consulting services: YDTC should continue to expand its consulting services to attract more clients and establish itself as a top-tier consulting firm in the EV charging station industry. The company can do this by developing and offering new services such as feasibility studies, site selection, and project management.

 

Develop charging station technology: YDTC should invest in research and development to improve the technology used in its charging stations. By developing more efficient, user-friendly, and innovative charging stations, the company can differentiate itself from competitors and attract more clients. Additionally, YDTC could consider developing its own branded charging stations to sell directly to customers.

 

Form strategic partnerships: YDTC should form strategic partnerships with other players in the EV industry, such as EV manufacturers, energy providers, and other charging station companies. These partnerships could provide access to new markets, customers, and technology, as well as help the company to stay up-to-date with the latest industry trends.

 

Raise capital: To fund its expansion plans, YDTC should consider raising capital through various means, such as placement, venture capital, private equity, or debt financing. With adequate funding, YDTC can invest in research and development, expand its operations, and compete with major players in the EV charging station industry.

 

Overall, YDTC’s growth plan should focus on expanding its consulting services, improving its technology, forming strategic partnerships, and raising capital to achieve its goal of becoming a central participant in the growing EV charging station industry.

 

Employees

 

We currently have an aggregate of 8 employees, two of whom are the officers and directors of ALTB. We anticipate hiring additional employees in the next twelve months. We anticipate hiring necessary personnel based on an as needed basis only on a per contract basis to be compensated directly from revenues.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We own no intellectual property.

 

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Service of Process and Enforceability of Civil Liabilities

 

There is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the PRC would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained against us or our directors or officers that are predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or the securities laws of any state in the United States, and (2) there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the PRC would entertain original actions brought in the PRC against us or our directors or officers that are predicated upon the federal securities laws of the United States or the securities laws of any state in the United States.

 

The recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided under the PRC Civil Procedure Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments under certain circumstances in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedure Law. Under PRC law, a foreign judgment that does not otherwise violate basic legal principles, state sovereignty, safety or social public interest of the PRC may be recognized and enforced by a PRC court, based either on bilateral treaties or international conventions contracted by China and the country where the judgment is made or on reciprocity between jurisdictions. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the United States. Under the PRC Civil Procedures Law, foreign shareholders may originate actions based on PRC law against us in the PRC, if they can establish sufficient nexus to the PRC for a PRC court to have jurisdiction, and meet other procedural requirements, including, among others, the plaintiff must have a direct interest in the case, and there must be a concrete claim, a factual basis and a cause for the suit.

 

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Management

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

On February 9, 2022, Zonghan Wu consented to act as the CFO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company. On June 27, 2022, Yufeng Zhang consented to act as the Chief Executive Officer, President, and member of the Board of Directors.

 

Name   Age   Position(s)
Yufeng Zhang   37   Chief Executive Officer, President, and Director
Zonghan Wu   44   CFO, Treasurer, Secretary, and Chairman of the Board of Directors

 

Yufeng Zhang Mr. Zhang received his bachelor’s degree in 2021 from Heilongjiang Oriental College. From September 2015 to June 2019, Mr. Zhang served as the Operations Manager at Heilongjiang Wisdom Light Culture Communication Co., Ltd. From July 2019 to October 2020 Mr. Zhang served as a Director of Laishan Network Technology (Xi’an) Co., Ltd; and from October 2020 to the present he has served as a Director of Guoao (Shenzhen) New Energy Co., Ltd.

 

Zonghan Wu Mr. Wu worked for Opus International Consultants as a Business Analyst in New Zealand from 2004 to 2007. He worked for Nestle as a Commercial Analyst from 2008 to 2011. Currently he is Managing Director of Shanghai JAZ Management Consulting Co. Ltd in Shanghai. Mr. Wu is currently Chairman and Company Secretary for the following public companies listed in the U.S.: SSHT S&T Group Ltd. (OTC Pink: SSHT) and Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. (OTC Pink: ALTB). Mr. Wu is also a Director and Company Secretary for the following public companies listed in the U.S.: Alliance Recovery Corp. (OTC Pink: ARVY), ACC Aviation Holdings Ltd. OTC Pink: CAVG), Interact Holdings Group, Inc. (OTC Pink: IHGP), Linike Medical Group Ltd. (OTC Pink: LNMG), Providence Resources, Inc. (OTC Pink: PVRS), Alpine Auto Brokers Inc. (OTC Pink: SIPN), ZKGC New Energy Ltd. (OTC Pink: ZKGCF), and Victor Mining Industry Group, Inc. (OTC Pink: VMTG). Mr. Wu was awarded a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Auckland in New Zealand in 2004.

 

Term of Office

 

Our directors hold their position until the next annual meeting of shareholders and until his successor is elected and qualified by our shareholders, or until earlier death, retirement, resignation or removal.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between the Company and any of our current and proposed directors or executive officers.

 

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Properties

 

Our mailing address is 46 Reeves Road, Pakuranga 2010, New Zealand. The Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary’s, YDTC’, address is Room 2136, Building 2, No. 119 Dongbao Road, Dongcheng Street, Dongguan City, Guangdong Province

 

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Legal Proceedings Involving Directors And Executive Officers

 

During the past ten years no current or incoming director, executive officer, promoter or control person of the Company has been involved in the following:

 

(1) A petition under the Federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law which was filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer was appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within two years before the time of such filing;

 

(2) Such person was convicted in a criminal proceeding or is a named subject of a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

(3) Such person was the subject of any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from, or otherwise limiting, the following activities:

 

i. Acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor, commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

 

ii. Engaging in any type of business practice; or

 

iii. Engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of Federal or State securities laws or Federal commodities laws;

 

(4) Such person was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any Federal or State authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (f)(3)(i) of this section, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;

 

(5) Such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commission to have violated any Federal or State securities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated;

 

(6) Such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any Federal commodities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated;

 

(7) Such person was the subject of, or a party to, any Federal or State judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of:

 

i. Any Federal or State securities or commodities law or regulation; Or

 

ii. Any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease and desist order, or removal or prohibition order; Or

 

iii. Any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; Or

 

(8) Such person was the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The table below sets forth the positions and compensations for the officers and directors of the Company, and for the officers and directors, for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

There are no employment agreements between the Company and its officers and directors. And since the change of control on September 8, 2022, the directors and officers have received no compensation. This policy, however, will be revised as the Company secure additional fundings.

 

Position   Name of Officers or Directors   Year   Salary before tax   Bonus   All other compensation   Total

Director, President, CEO

 

Yufeng Zhang

  2022   n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a
    2021   n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a
                         

Director, Secretary, CFO

 

Zonghan Wu

  2022   n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a
    2021   n/a   n/a   n/a   n/a

 

We do not have an audit or compensation committee comprised of independent directors as our Company qualifies for an exemption from these requirements. Indeed, we do not have any audit or compensation committee. These functions are performed by our Board of Directors as a whole.

 

All directors serve 1 yr. terms.

 

Related Party Transactions

 

None

 

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SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth certain information with respect to the beneficial ownership of our voting securities following the completion of the Reverse Merger, and the increase of the described in Items 1.01 of this report by (i) any person or group owning more than 5% of any class of voting securities, (ii) each director, (iii) our chief executive officer and (iv) all executive officers and directors of ALTB as a group as of June 30, 2023.

 

Name   Number of
Shares of
Common Stock
    Percentage  
Yufeng Zhang                
Room 2136, Building 2, No. 119 Dongbao Road, Dongcheng Street, Dongguan City, Guangdong Province     0       0 %
                 
Zonghan Wu                
46 Reeves Road, Pakuranga 2010, Aukland, New Zealand     400,950,000       88 %
                 
All executives officers, directors, and beneficial ownership thereof as a group 2 people)     400,950,000       88 %

 

There are no other officer or director 5 % shareholders.

 

Unless otherwise indicated in the footnotes to this table and subject to community property laws where applicable, each of the stockholders named in this table has sole or shared voting and investment power with respect to the shares indicated as beneficially owned. Except as set forth above, applicable percentages are based upon 455,500,000 shares of common stock outstanding.

 

The holders of our common stock are entitled to one vote for each share held of record on all matters to be voted on by stockholders.

 

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Certain Relationships And Related Transactions

 

Except as described herein, none of the following parties (each a “Related Party”) has had any material interest, direct or indirect, in any transaction with us or in any presently proposed transaction that has or will materially affect us:

 

  any of our directors or officers;

 

  any person proposed as a nominee for election as a director;

 

  any person who beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, shares carrying more than 10% of the voting rights attached to our outstanding shares of common stock; or

 

  any member of the immediate family (including spouse, parents, children, siblings and in- laws) of any of the above persons.

 

None

 

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Description of Share Capital

 

We have authorized 990,000,000 shares of common stock with par value $0.001 per share. As of May 1, 2023, the Company has issued and outstanding 455,500,000 shares of common stock. We have authorized 10,000,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock. As of December 31, 2022, the Company has issued and outstanding 0 shares of Preferred Stock. We do not have different authorized classes of stock other than afore-mentioned.

 

Common Stock

 

The holders of our common stock are entitled to one vote for each share held of record on all matters to be voted on by stockholders. There is no cumulative voting with respect to the election of directors, with the result that the holders of more than 50% of the shares voting for the election of directors can elect all of the directors then up for election. The holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by the Board of Directors out of funds legally available therefor. In the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our company, the holders of common stock are entitled to share ratably in all assets remaining which are available for distribution to them after payment of liabilities and after provision has been made for each class of stock, if any, having preference over the common stock. Holders of shares of our common stock, as such, have no conversion, pre-emptive or other subscription rights, and there are no redemption provisions applicable to the common stock.

 

Preferred Stock

 

The holders of our Series A preferred stock are entitled to vote at 90% of the total number of issued and outstanding shares on all matters to be voted on by stockholders. The Series A preferred stock also convert into 90% of the total number of issued and outstanding shares. The holders of our preferred stock are entitled to receive dividends when, as and if declared by the Board of Directors out of funds legally available therefore. In the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our company, the holders of preferred stock are entitled to share ratably in all assets remaining which are available for distribution to them after payment of liabilities and after provision has been made for each class of stock, if any, having preference over the Series A preferred stock. We do not have different authorized classes of stock other than aforementioned.

 

Controlling Shareholder(s)’ Ability

 

The controlling shareholder(s)’ shall and will have ability to control matters requiring shareholder approval, including election of directors, amendment of organizational documents, and approval of major corporate transactions, such as a change in control, merger, consolidation, or sale of assets.

 

Indemnification of Directors and Officers

 

Section 78.138 of the NRS provides that a director or officer will not be individually liable unless it is proven that (i) the director’s or officer’s acts or omissions constituted a breach of his or her fiduciary duties, and (ii) such breach involved intentional misconduct, fraud or a knowing violation of the law.

 

Section 78.7502 of NRS permits a company to indemnify its directors and officers against expenses, judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement actually and reasonably incurred in connection with a threatened, pending or completed action, suit or proceeding if the officer or director (i) is not liable pursuant to NRS 78.138 or (ii) acted in good faith and in a manner the officer or director reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the corporation and, if a criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe the conduct of the officer or director was unlawful.

 

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Section 78.751 of NRS permits a Nevada company to indemnify its officers and directors against expenses incurred by them in defending a civil or criminal action, suit or proceeding as they are incurred and in advance of final disposition thereof, upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of the officer or director to repay the amount if it is ultimately determined by a court of competent jurisdiction that such officer or director is not entitled to be indemnified by the company. Section 78.751 of NRS further permits the company to grant its directors and officers additional rights of indemnification under its articles of incorporation or bylaws or otherwise.

 

Section 78.752 of NRS provides that a Nevada company may purchase and maintain insurance or make other financial arrangements on behalf of any person who is or was a director, officer, employee or agent of the company, or is or was serving at the request of the company as a director, officer, employee or agent of another company, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise, for any liability asserted against him and liability and expenses incurred by him in his capacity as a director, officer, employee or agent, or arising out of his status as such, whether or not the company has the authority to indemnify him against such liability and expenses. Our Bylaws provide that we may indemnify and advance litigation expenses to our directors, officers, employees and agents to the extent permitted by law, our Articles of Incorporation or our Bylaws, and shall indemnify and advance litigation expenses to our directors, officers, employees and agents to the extent required by law, our Articles of Incorporation or Bylaws. Our obligations of indemnification, if any, shall be conditioned on receiving prompt notice of the claim and the opportunity to settle and defend the claim. We may, to the extent permitted by law, purchase and maintain insurance on behalf of an individual who is or was our director, officer, employee or agent.

 

Indemnification against Public Policy

 

Insofar as indemnification by us for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to our directors, officers or persons controlling the company pursuant to provisions of our Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws, or otherwise, we have been advised that in the opinion of the Securities and Exchange Commission, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification by such director, officer or controlling person of us in the successful defence of any action, suit or proceeding is asserted by such director, officer or controlling person in connection with the securities being offered, we will, unless in the opinion of our counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction the question whether such indemnification by us is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue.

 

The effect of indemnification may be to limit the rights of the Company and the shareholders (through shareholders’ derivative suits on behalf of the Company) to recover monetary damages and expenses against a director for breach of fiduciary duty.

 

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Shares Eligible for Future Sale

 

Future sales of substantial amounts of shares of our Common Shares in the public market after this offering, or the possibility of these sales occurring, could cause the prevailing market price for our Common Shares to fall or impair our ability to raise equity capital in the future. Following this offering, the Common Shares that were not offered and sold in our initial public offering are “restricted securities,” as that term is defined in Rule 144 under the Securities Act. These restricted securities are eligible for public sale only if they are registered under the Securities Act or if they qualify for an exemption from registration under Rule 144 or Rule 701 under the Securities Act, which are summarized below.

 

These restricted securities may be available for sale in the public market under Rule 144 one year following the filing of this registration statement on Form S-1.

 

Rule 144

 

Sales of our Common Stock under Rule 144 could reduce the price of our stock. There are 445,500,000 issued and outstanding shares of our Common Stock that Rule 144 of the Securities Act defines as restricted securities.

 

These shares will be subject to the resale restrictions of Rule 144. In general, persons holding restricted securities, including affiliates, must hold their shares for a period of at least year, affiliates may not sell more than 1.0% of the total issued and outstanding shares in any 90-day period, and affiliates must resell the shares in an unsolicited brokerage transaction at the market price. The availability for sale of substantial amounts of Common Stock under Rule 144 could reduce prevailing market prices for our securities.

 

WE URGE POTENTIAL PURCHASERS OF OUR SHARES TO CONSULT THEIR OWN TAX ADVISORS
CONCERNING THE U.S. FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL AND NON-U.S. TAX CONSEQUENCES OF PURCHASING,
OWNING AND DISPOSING OF OUR SHARES.

 

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Plan of Distribution

 

The Company is also offering up to a total of 120,000,000 shares of common stock in a best-efforts, direct public offering, solely by our Chief Executive Officer, Yufeng Zhang, without any involvement of underwriters. The offering price is $0.01 per share. The offering will terminate 365 days from the date of this prospectus or when all of the Shares are sold, whichever comes first. We also have the right to terminate this offering at any time prior to the expiration of the offering period. Yufeng Zhang will use our best efforts to sell as many shares as possible up to the maximum offering amount of 120,000,000 shares. This is no minimum offering amount. We may accept or reject any subscription amount from any investor in our sole discretion or we may accept only part of a subscription amount. Expenses related to the offering are estimated to be $50,000.

 

We will sell the shares in this offering exclusively through our officers and directors. They will receive no commission from the sale of any shares by the Company. They will not register as a broker/dealer under the 1934 Act in reliance upon Rule 3a4-1 under the 1934 Act. They may rely upon Rule 3a4-1 because (i) they are not subject to any statutory disqualifications, as defined in Section 3(a)(39) of the 1934 Act, (ii) they will not be compensated in connection with the sale of the Company’s securities by the payment of commissions or other remuneration based either directly or indirectly on transactions in the securities, (iii) they are not associated persons of a broker or dealer, (iv) they will primarily perform, at the end of the offering, substantial duties for or on behalf of the Company, otherwise than in connection with transactions in securities, (v) they were not a broker or dealer, or an associated person thereof, within the preceding 12 months, (vi) they do not participate in selling an offering of securities for any issuer more than once every 12 months, except in reliance on (iv) and (v) above. The Company will register as the issuer-agent in those states requiring such registration.

 

We anticipate that our common stock will continue to be subject to the penny stock rules under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These rules regulate broker/dealer practices for transactions in “penny stocks.” Penny stocks are generally equity securities with a price of less than $5.00. The penny stock rules require broker/dealers to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker/dealer must also provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker/dealer and its salesperson and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations and the broker/dealer and salesperson compensation information must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to completing the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction, the broker and/or dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. The transaction costs associated with penny stocks are high, reducing the number of broker-dealers who may be willing to engage in the trading of our shares. These additional penny stock disclosure requirements are burdensome and may reduce all of the trading activity in the market for our common stock. As long as the common stock is subject to the penny stock rules, holders of our common stock may find it more difficult to sell their shares.

 

Our officers and directors may purchase shares in this offering; however any such purchases will be held for investment purposes only and they will be subject to Regulation M and will act accordingly, including through filing the notice and information relating to distributions subject to Regulation M under Rule 5190, Rule 6275(f) and the trade reporting rules. They shall file all notices related to these rules with FINRA’s Market Regulation Department electronically through the FINRA Firm Gateway.

 

In certain states the Shares may not be sold unless the Shares have been registered or qualified for sale in such state or an exemption from registration or qualification is available and is complied with.

 

76

 

Procedures for Subscribing

 

If you decide to subscribe for any Shares in this offering, please make:

 

Direct Deposit:

 

Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd.

Address: Room 2136, Building 2, No. 119 Dongbao Road, Dongcheng Street, Dongguan City, Guangdong Province

 

Bank: Dongguan Rural Commercial Bank Nancheng Branch

Bank Address: No. 44, Nancheng Road Section, Guantai Avenue, Dongguan City, Guangdong, China

Account Number#: 110010190010095616

SWIFT Code: 313602088017

 

All checks for subscriptions must be made payable to “Yinao (Dongguan) Technology Co., Ltd.”.

 

Right to Reject Subscriptions

 

We have the right to accept or reject subscriptions in whole or in part, for any reason or for no reason. All monies from rejected subscriptions will be returned immediately by us to the subscriber, without interest or deductions. Subscriptions for shares will be accepted or rejected within five business days after we receive them. Furthermore, once a subscription agreement is accepted, it will be executed without reconfirmation to or from the subscriber. Once ALTB accepts a subscription, the subscriber cannot withdraw it unless otherwise dictated by state law.

 

77

 

Legal Matters

 

The validity of the issuance of the shares of common stock will be passed upon for the company by McMurdo Law Group, LLC. Counsel has additionally consented to his opinion being included as an exhibit to this filing. Additionally, counsel has consented to being named in the prospectus.

 

The legal counsel that passed their opinion on the legality of these securities is:

 

McMurdo Law Group, LLC

Matthew McMurdo, Esq.

1185 Avenue of the Americas, 3rd Floor New York, NY 10036

 

Experts

 

The audited financial statements of NHIL as of December 31, 2022 are appended to this report and were audited by HAOXIN. The audited financial statements of the Company as of December 31, 2022 and 2021 are appended to this report beginning on page F-1 and were audited by BF Borgers CPA PC. The unaudited financial statements of the Company as of June 30, 2023 and 2022 are appended to this report and were reviewed by HAOXIN.

 

On February 14, 2023, the Company terminated its engagement with BF Borgers CPA PC (“BFB”), the Registrant’s prior independent registered public accounting firm, and thereafter provided BFB with its disclosures in this registration statement on Form S-1/A disclosing the termination of the engagement of BFB and requested in writing that BFB furnish the Company with a letter addressed to the Securities and Exchange Commission stating whether or not they agree with such disclosures. BFB’s response is filed as an exhibit to this Form S-1/A.

 

The auditor reports by BFB contained in the financial statements of the Company for the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, filed as part of this S-1/A, did not contain an adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion or were qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principles, other than to state that there is substantial doubt as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. There had been no disagreements with BFB on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedure during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, nor in the subsequent periods through March 31, 2023.

 

On April 1, 2023, the Board of Directors of the Company engaged Shandong Haoxin CPA Co., Ltd. (“HSCC”) as its independent accountant to provide auditing services for going forward for the Company. The Company has terminated the engagement of BFB. The decision to hire HSCC was approved by the Company’s Board of Directors.

 

Where You Can Find Additional Information

 

We have filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-1 under the Securities Act with respect to the Common Shares offered hereby. This prospectus, which constitutes a part of the registration statement, does not contain all of the information set forth in the registration statement or the exhibits filed therewith. For further information about us and the Common Shares offered hereby, reference is made to the registration statement and the exhibits filed therewith. Statements contained in this prospectus regarding the contents of any contract or any other document that is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement are not necessarily complete, and in each instance we refer you to the copy of such contract or other document filed as an exhibit to the registration statement. We currently do not file periodic reports with the SEC. We will file periodic reports (including an annual report on Form 10-K, which we will be required to file within 90 days from the end of each fiscal year, and Form 10-Q, which we will be required to file within 45 days of the end of each fiscal quarter), and other information with the SEC pursuant to the Exchange Act once this registration statement on Form S-1 becomes effective. A copy of the registration statement and the exhibits filed therewith may be inspected without charge at the public reference room maintained by the SEC, located at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549, and copies of all or any part of the registration statement may be obtained from that office. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information about the public reference room. The SEC also maintains a website that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding registrants that file electronically with the SEC. The address of the website is http://www.sec.gov.

 

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INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

    Page
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS:    
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2023 (unaudited) and December 31, 2022 and 2021   F-2
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2023 and 2022 (unaudited) and the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021   F-3
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2023 and 2022 (unaudited) and the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021   F-4
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity (Deficit) for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2023 and 2022 (unaudited) and the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021   F-5
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2023 and 2022 (unaudited) and the Years Ended December 31, 2022 and 2021   F-6
Notes to the Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements   F-7

 

F-1

 

ALPINE AUTO BROKERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

                    
    Note  June 30,
2023
   December 31,
2022
   December 31,
2021
 
       (unaudited)         
       US$   US$   US$ 
ASSETS                   
Current assets:                   
Cash and cash equivalents       25,163    -    - 
Accounts Receivable, net       53,108    -    - 
Total current assets       78,271    -    - 
Property and equipment, net       1,123    -    - 
Goodwill       60,006    -    - 
TOTAL ASSETS       139,399    -    - 
                    
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                   
Current liabilities                   
Amounts due to a related party       56,547    29,740    - 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities       126,636    14,704    14,704 
Total current liabilities       183,183    44,444    14,704 
TOTAL LIABILITIES       183,183    44,444    14,704 
Shareholders’ deficit:                   
Common Stock - $0.001 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized; 455,500,000, 445,500,000 and 44,550,000 shares issued and outstanding June 30, 2023 and December 31, 2022 and 2021       455,500    445,500    44,550 
Preferred Stock       -    -    10,000 
Additional paid-in capital       149,347    149,347    540,297 
Accumulated deficit       (647,375)   (639,291)   (609,551)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (income)       (1,256)   -    - 
Total shareholders’ deficit       (43,784)   (44,444)   (14,704)
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT       139,399    -    - 

 

F-2

 

ALPINE AUTO BROKERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

                         
       Six Months Ended
June 30,
   Year Ended
December 31,
 
    Note  2023   2022   2022   2021 
       (unaudited)         
       US$   US$   US$   US$ 
Net revenues       129,781    -    -    - 
Gross profit       129,781    -    -    - 
Operating expenses:                        
General and administrative expenses       (137,865)   (10,959)   (29,740)   (345,356)
Total operating expenses       (137,865)   (10,959)   (29,740)   (345,356)
Loss(income) from operations       (8,083)   (10,959)   (29,740)   (345,356)
Loss(income) before income taxes       (8,083)   (10,959)   (29,740)   (345,356)
Net loss(income)       (8,083)   (10,959)   (29,740)   (345,356)
Net loss(income) attributable to ordinary shareholders       (8,083)